Why There Are Words

Why There Are Words Presents “Everybody Knows” Sept. 8, 2016

Posted in readings by whytherearewords on August 15, 2016

Why There Are Words presents an evening of readings on the theme “Everybody Knows.” Join us September 8, 2016 at Studio 333 on 333 Caledonia Street in Sausalito to hear the following acclaimed authors. Doors open at 7pm; readings begin at 7:15. $10.

Mardith Louisell

Mardith Louisell

Mardith Louisell writes short and shorter stories whose narrators might be a bit unhinged. Of all her titles, her favorite is “Had They Learned about Jayne Mansfield?”, a story published in Solstice Literary Magazine. She grew up on Lake Superior in Northern Minnesota and her fiction, essays, and memoirs can be found most recently in Crossborder Journal, Smokelong Quarterly, Sleet, and Best Travel Writing – Travelers’ Tales. She’s been awarded residencies around the country and takes pictures of people’s ears, which can be found at her website. The rest of the time she writes, edits, and works in the child welfare field in San Francisco.

Elizabeth McKenzie

Elizabeth McKenzie

Elizabeth McKenzie is the author, most recently, of the novel The Portable Veblen (Penguin Press, 2016). Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and other places. She is the managing editor of Catamaran Literary Reader and senior editor of the Chicago Quarterly Review.

Linda Michel-Cassidy

Linda Michel-Cassidy

Linda Michel-Cassidy’s writing can be found in Harpur Palate, Electric Literature, Jabberwock, the anthology Seeking Its Own Level, and others. She is a contributing editor at Entropy Magazine, and starting this fall, will be conducting author interviews for the Mill Valley Library’s podcast. She recently guest-edited The Notebook, a publication of the Grassroots Women’s Project.  In addition, she is an installation artist, and has shown work throughout the U.S. and abroad. She holds an MFA in writing from Bennington, and another, in visual arts, from the California College of the Arts. She has taught writing and art for the last fifteen years, including four years as a resident artist in Taos, New Mexico.

Ed Porter

Ed Porter

Edward Porter’s short fiction has appeared in the Gettysburg Review, the Hudson Review, Colorado Review, Barrelhouse, Best New American Voices, and is forthcoming in Glimmer Train. He holds an MFA from Warren Wilson College and a PhD from the University of Houston, and has been honored with Madison, McDowell, and Stegner fellowships. This fall he will start as a Jones Lecturer in Creative Writing at Stanford University.

Matthew Siegel

Matthew Siegel

Matthew Siegel is the author of Blood Work (University of Wisconsin/CBe, March 2015), which was shortlisted for the Forward Prize for best first collection. His poems and essays have appeared in The Guardian, Gulf Coast, Indiana Review, Ninth Letter, The Rumpus, and elsewhere. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford, he teaches literature and writing at San Francisco Conservatory of Music.

Frances Stroh

Frances Stroh

Frances Stroh is the author of Beer Money: A Memoir of Privilege and Loss (recently published by HarperCollins), which chronicles her coming of age as an artist in the midst of the Stroh’s Beer family’s decline coupled with the unraveling of Detroit. The New York Times said of Beer Money, “Stroh’s absorbing memoir suggests that most cocoons are permeable and that privilege is relative.” Frances is also the co-host of the Stranger Than Fiction reading series.

Anastacia Renee Tolbert

Anastacia Renee Tolbert

Anastacia Renee Tolbert, Writer in Residence at the Richard Hugo House, a home for writers in Seattle, is a queer super-shero of color moonlighting as a writer, performance artist, and creative writing workshop facilitator. She has received awards and fellowships from Cave Canem, Hedgebrook, VONA, Jack Straw, Ragdale, and Artist Trust. She was recently selected as the 2015-16 Writer-in-Residence at Hugo House, a place for writers in Seattle. Her Chapbook 26, published by Dancing Girl Press, is an abbreviated alphabet expression of the lower and uppercase lives of women and girls. Her poetry, & fiction have been published in Literary Orphans, Bitterzoet, Radius Poetry, Seattle Review, Duende, Bone Bouquet, Dressing Room Poetry and many more. Anastacia Renee has been expanding her creative repertoire into the field of social justice installation art, and has exhibited her abstract paintings, text and photography surrounding the body as a polarized place of both the private and political.

Heather Young

Heather Young

Heather Young grew up in Maryland but has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area since 1991. She’s also strongly rooted in the Midwest: her parents grew up in small Iowa towns and met at the University of Iowa. Though they raised their children in the Washington, D.C., area, they brought them to Minnesota every summer. It’s this emotional connection that Heather drew upon to create the characters, events, and settings in her debut novel The Lost Girls (William Morrow, July 2016. Heather received an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars in 2011. She lives in Mill Valley with her two teenaged children and her husband. When she’s not writing, she loves biking and hiking on Mount Tam, skiing, and reading books she wishes she’d written.

Why There Are Words takes place every second Thursday of the month, when people come from San Francisco, the North Bay, the East Bay, the South Bay–everywhere–to crowd the house. The brainchild of Peg Alford Pursell, this literary goodness has been going strong for six years, and is now an independent publisher of books, WTAW Press.

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents “Underneath”

Posted in readings by whytherearewords on July 15, 2012

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents the following readers on the theme Underneath August 9 at Studio 333 in Sausalito, 7-9pm. $5. Join us for an extraordinary night as seven authors reveal worlds underneath words.

Melissa Cistaro

Melissa Cistaro’s stories have been published in the New Ohio Review, Brevity, Anderbo.com, Sparkle and Blink, the KQED Perspectives series, and in the anthology Cherished: 21 Writers on Animals They Have Loved and Lost.  Her essay “The Undertow” was a semi-finalist in Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland’s Notes & Words essay contest.

David Corbett

David Corbett is the author of four novels: The Devil’s Redhead, Done for a Dime (a New York Times Notable Book), Blood of Paradise (nominated for numerous awards, including the Edgar), and Do They Know I’m Running (Spinetingler Award, Best Novel Rising Star Category 2011). His short fiction and poetry have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, with two stories selected for Best American Mystery Stories (2009 and 2011). In May 2012, Mysterious Press/Open Road Media re-issued his first two novels plus a story collection in ebook format, and Penguin will publish his textbook on the craft of characterization The Art of Character in January 2013.

Jennifer duBois

Jennifer duBois is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and recently completed a Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University. Her fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in Playboy, The Missouri Review, The Kenyon Review, ZYZZYVA, The Northwest Review, and elsewhere. Her first novel, A Partial History of Lost Causes, was published by The Dial Press in March 2012.

C.J. Hribal is the author of the novel The Company Car, which received the Anne Powers Book Award, and the novel American Beauty.  He’s also the author of the short fiction collections Matty’s Heart and The Clouds in Memphis, which won the AWP Award for Short Fiction, and he edited The Boundaries of Twilight: Czecho-Slovak Writing from the New World. He has held Fellowships from the NEA, the Bush, and from the Guggenheim Foundations, and has twice won the Sternig Award for Short Fiction.  He is the Louise Edna Goeden Professor of English at Marquette University, and is a member of the fiction faculty at the Warren Wilson College MFA Program for Writers.

Kara Levy

Kara Levy’s fiction appears in Alaska Quarterly Review, Mississippi Review Prize Issue 2009, TriQuarterly, Zen Monster, Drunken Boat, the Huffington Post, and Narrative, where she was a winner of the 30Below Prize for writers under 30. A graduate of the MFA program at Columbia University, she was a recent Steinbeck Fellow in Fiction at the Center for Steinbeck Studies in San Jose. She lives in San Francisco.

Wendy Merrill

Wendy Merrill’s memoir, Falling into Manholes: The Memoir of a Bad/Good Girl (Putnam 2008), was sold at the Maui Writers Conference in 2006. Her personal essays also appear in the anthology Single Woman of a Certain Age (Inner Ocean, 2006) and, Single State of the Union (Seal Press, 2007). She is described by Anne Lamott as “a wonderful new voice — smart, funny, and wildly real.” She founded WAM Marketing Group, a unique marketing communications company based in Sausalito, where she currently lives above ground and beyond her means.

Frances Stroh

Frances Stroh is an installation artist turned writer who lived and worked in London for two years on a Fulbright Grant. She is writing a memoir entitled “Fire-Brewed: The Fall of the Stroh’s Beer Family” about her family who made beer in Detroit for a hundred and fifty years. Her work has appeared in Rosebud and on her blog, Irritable Brain Syndrome. She struggles mightily to employ Twitter in creative ways but enjoys the process.



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