Why There Are Words

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on October 17, 2012

Join us at Studio 333 in Sausalito, November 8. Our promise: A magical night of stories from seven remarkable writers on the theme, Promise. 333 Caledonia Street, Sausalito, 7 pm. $5.  

Fred Arroyo

Fred Arroyo is the author of Western Avenue and Other Fictions (University of Arizona Press, 2012), as well as The Region of Lost Names (U of Arizona P, 2008). Named one of the Top Ten New Latino Authors to Watch (and Read) in 2009 by LatinoStories.com, he is also a recipient of an Individual Artist Grant from the Indiana Arts Commission. Fred has published fiction, poetry, and essays in various literary journals and in the anthologies The Colors of Nature (Milkweed 2011) and Camino del Sol: Fifteen Years of Latina and Latino Writing (University of Arizona 2010). Currently, he is completing a book of essays in which he lyrically meditates on work, reading and writing, migration and place—sources of creativity arising from his life and work in the Midwest, growing up bilingual on the East Coast, and then being caught between urban and rural worlds. He is also working on a novel set primarily in the Caribbean. Fred lives in Vermillion, South Dakota, where he teaches fiction and creative nonfiction in the MA/PhD Program in Creative Writing, as well in the undergraduate program at the University of South Dakota. Fred walks as much as possible, enjoys bike rides with his nine-year-old son, and finds as of late that driving in the upper Midwest is the tonic that brings writing and life together.

Stacy Bierlein

Stacy Bierleinis the author of the story collection A Vacation on the Island of Ex-Boyfriends and a co-editor of the short fiction anthology Men Undressed: Women Writers and the Male Sexual Experience. Her award-winning anthology of international fiction, A Stranger Among Us: Stories of Cross Cultural Collision and Connection, is used in university classrooms across the country. She is a founding editor of Other Voices Books and the Morgan Street International Novel Series. Her articles about writing, publishing, and the arts appear on various websites, including The Rumpus. She lives in Southern California.

Leslie Ingham

Leslie Ingham was classically educated at St. John’s College in Annapolis and has her MA in Rhetoric and Composition from the University of Maryland. Her work has appeared in Fiction 365 and Energeia, and been recognized by Narrative Magazine. She is a founding member of San Francisco’s Portuguese Artists Colony, where she regularly reads her work. She is also an editor at PAC: Books, and is currently at work on a novel.

Patricia Ann McNair

Patricia Ann McNair’s collection of short stories is The Temple of Air. She has lived 98 percent of her life in the Midwest, where she’s managed a gas station, sold pots and pans door-to-door, tended bar and breaded mushrooms, worked on the trading floor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, and taught aerobics. Today she is an associate professor in the Fiction Writing Department of Columbia College Chicago, where she received a nomination for the Carnegie Foundation’s US Professor of the Year. Her collection of stories, called “a beautiful book, intense and original,” by Audrey Niffenegger, has received a number of honors, among them the winner of Southern Illinois University’s Devil’s Kitchen Reading Award and the Society of Midland Authors Finalist Award.

Zack Rogow

Zack Rogow’s seventh book of poems is My Mother and the Ceiling Dancers, (Kattywompus Press, February 2012). He is editor and/or translator of nineteen books or plays. His writing has appeared in a variety of magazines, from American Poetry Review to Zyzzyva. His translations from French include work by Colette, George Sand, and André Breton. Currently he teaches in the low-residency  MFA at the University of Alaska, Anchorage. His blog is titled Advice for Writers.

Jenn Scott

Jenn Scott’s stories have appeared in The Cincinnati Review, Bellingham Review, The Gettysburg Review, Seattle Review, Santa Monica Review, Cream City Review, Phoebe, Confrontation, Gulf Coast, Juked, New South, and The Los Angeles ReviewShe lives with four cats and a husband in Oakland, California where she obsesses over football and is presumably at work on her first novel.

Rayme Waters

Rayme Waters is the author of the debut novel The Angels’ Share. She has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and a Dzanc Best of the Web Award. Most recently, her work has appeared in The Summerset Review, The Rumpus, and The Meadowland Review. Born in San Francisco, she grew up in Northern California and the city of Linköping, Sweden.

December 9 Reading: Wild Card — Anything Goes

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on November 16, 2010

Join us December 9 at 7:00 PM for the last Why There Are Words reading event of the year. It’s been a wonderful year that we’ll end in style with work from emerging and widely-published fiction writers, some prose poetry, and an excerpt and discussion of a graphic novel. Wild Card — Anything Goes is the theme. Don’t miss it.

Andrew Sean Greer

Andrew Sean Greer is the bestselling author of four works of fiction, most recently The Story of a Marriage. He’s the recipient of the PEN/O’Henry Prize for Short Fiction, the Northern California Book Award, the California Book Award, the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Public Library.

Daphne Kalotay

Daphne Kalotay is the author of the newly published novel Russian Winter (HarperCollins 2010), which was a finalist for the James Jones First Novel Fellowship.  Her fiction collection Calamity and Other Stories (KnopfDoubleday 2005) was a Poets & Writers “Notable Book” and short-listed for the 2005 Story Prize.

A recipient of fellowships from the Christopher Isherwood Foundation, the MacDowell Colony, and Yaddo, she lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.

Caitlin Myer

Caitlin Myer‘s short stories have been published in charming, short-lived literary magazines, online journals and the occasional anthology.  Her one-woman play about Simone de Beauvoir attracted sold-out crowds in Seattle, Salt Lake City, and Provo, Utah. Yes, she was raised Mormon.  No, she doesn’t practice.  If you buy her a drink, she’ll be happy to tell you all about it. Her first novel, Hoodoo, flirts with publishers, but fears commitment.  She is the Founder of Portuguese Artists Colony, a collection of disreputable characters who write and stage monthly readings at Fivepoints Arthouse in San Francisco. She is not Portuguese.

Erich Origen is an artist living in San Francisco, and the author of The

Erich Origen as Unemployed Man

Adventures of Unemployed Man. His previous book, Goodnight Bush, was a New York Times bestseller and has sold more than 120,000 copies. He and co-author Gan Golan have appeared on CNN, Time, Huffington Post and others to discuss the book.

Peter Orner

Peter Orner is the author of the novel, The Second Coming of Mavala Shikongo, finalist for the Los Angles Times Book Prize, and Esther Stories, Winner of the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His work has appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, Granta, Best American Stories, and twice received the Pushcart Prize. A 2006 Guggenheim Fellow, Orner is also the editor of the oral history, Underground America, and co-editor (with Annie Holmes) of Hope Deferred: Narratives of Zimbabwean Lives just out from McSweeney’s. A new novel, Love and Shame and Love, will be published by Little Brown in fall, 2011.  He teaches at San Francisco State.

Robert Thomas

Robert Thomas’ first book, Door to Door, was selected by Yusef Komunyakaa as winner of the Poets Out Loud Prize and published by Fordham University Press in 2002, and his second book, Dragging the Lake, was published by Carnegie Mellon University Press in 2006. He has received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and a Pushcart Prize. He lives in Oakland, California.

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