Why There Are Words

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on October 17, 2012

Join us at Studio 333 in Sausalito, November 8. Our promise: A magical night of stories from seven remarkable writers on the theme, Promise. 333 Caledonia Street, Sausalito, 7 pm. $5.  

Fred Arroyo

Fred Arroyo is the author of Western Avenue and Other Fictions (University of Arizona Press, 2012), as well as The Region of Lost Names (U of Arizona P, 2008). Named one of the Top Ten New Latino Authors to Watch (and Read) in 2009 by LatinoStories.com, he is also a recipient of an Individual Artist Grant from the Indiana Arts Commission. Fred has published fiction, poetry, and essays in various literary journals and in the anthologies The Colors of Nature (Milkweed 2011) and Camino del Sol: Fifteen Years of Latina and Latino Writing (University of Arizona 2010). Currently, he is completing a book of essays in which he lyrically meditates on work, reading and writing, migration and place—sources of creativity arising from his life and work in the Midwest, growing up bilingual on the East Coast, and then being caught between urban and rural worlds. He is also working on a novel set primarily in the Caribbean. Fred lives in Vermillion, South Dakota, where he teaches fiction and creative nonfiction in the MA/PhD Program in Creative Writing, as well in the undergraduate program at the University of South Dakota. Fred walks as much as possible, enjoys bike rides with his nine-year-old son, and finds as of late that driving in the upper Midwest is the tonic that brings writing and life together.

Stacy Bierlein

Stacy Bierleinis the author of the story collection A Vacation on the Island of Ex-Boyfriends and a co-editor of the short fiction anthology Men Undressed: Women Writers and the Male Sexual Experience. Her award-winning anthology of international fiction, A Stranger Among Us: Stories of Cross Cultural Collision and Connection, is used in university classrooms across the country. She is a founding editor of Other Voices Books and the Morgan Street International Novel Series. Her articles about writing, publishing, and the arts appear on various websites, including The Rumpus. She lives in Southern California.

Leslie Ingham

Leslie Ingham was classically educated at St. John’s College in Annapolis and has her MA in Rhetoric and Composition from the University of Maryland. Her work has appeared in Fiction 365 and Energeia, and been recognized by Narrative Magazine. She is a founding member of San Francisco’s Portuguese Artists Colony, where she regularly reads her work. She is also an editor at PAC: Books, and is currently at work on a novel.

Patricia Ann McNair

Patricia Ann McNair’s collection of short stories is The Temple of Air. She has lived 98 percent of her life in the Midwest, where she’s managed a gas station, sold pots and pans door-to-door, tended bar and breaded mushrooms, worked on the trading floor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, and taught aerobics. Today she is an associate professor in the Fiction Writing Department of Columbia College Chicago, where she received a nomination for the Carnegie Foundation’s US Professor of the Year. Her collection of stories, called “a beautiful book, intense and original,” by Audrey Niffenegger, has received a number of honors, among them the winner of Southern Illinois University’s Devil’s Kitchen Reading Award and the Society of Midland Authors Finalist Award.

Zack Rogow

Zack Rogow’s seventh book of poems is My Mother and the Ceiling Dancers, (Kattywompus Press, February 2012). He is editor and/or translator of nineteen books or plays. His writing has appeared in a variety of magazines, from American Poetry Review to Zyzzyva. His translations from French include work by Colette, George Sand, and André Breton. Currently he teaches in the low-residency  MFA at the University of Alaska, Anchorage. His blog is titled Advice for Writers.

Jenn Scott

Jenn Scott’s stories have appeared in The Cincinnati Review, Bellingham Review, The Gettysburg Review, Seattle Review, Santa Monica Review, Cream City Review, Phoebe, Confrontation, Gulf Coast, Juked, New South, and The Los Angeles ReviewShe lives with four cats and a husband in Oakland, California where she obsesses over football and is presumably at work on her first novel.

Rayme Waters

Rayme Waters is the author of the debut novel The Angels’ Share. She has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and a Dzanc Best of the Web Award. Most recently, her work has appeared in The Summerset Review, The Rumpus, and The Meadowland Review. Born in San Francisco, she grew up in Northern California and the city of Linköping, Sweden.

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents “Underneath”

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on July 15, 2012

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents the following readers on the theme Underneath August 9 at Studio 333 in Sausalito, 7-9pm. $5. Join us for an extraordinary night as seven authors reveal worlds underneath words.

Melissa Cistaro

Melissa Cistaro’s stories have been published in the New Ohio Review, Brevity, Anderbo.com, Sparkle and Blink, the KQED Perspectives series, and in the anthology Cherished: 21 Writers on Animals They Have Loved and Lost.  Her essay “The Undertow” was a semi-finalist in Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland’s Notes & Words essay contest.

David Corbett

David Corbett is the author of four novels: The Devil’s Redhead, Done for a Dime (a New York Times Notable Book), Blood of Paradise (nominated for numerous awards, including the Edgar), and Do They Know I’m Running (Spinetingler Award, Best Novel Rising Star Category 2011). His short fiction and poetry have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, with two stories selected for Best American Mystery Stories (2009 and 2011). In May 2012, Mysterious Press/Open Road Media re-issued his first two novels plus a story collection in ebook format, and Penguin will publish his textbook on the craft of characterization The Art of Character in January 2013.

Jennifer duBois

Jennifer duBois is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and recently completed a Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University. Her fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in Playboy, The Missouri Review, The Kenyon Review, ZYZZYVA, The Northwest Review, and elsewhere. Her first novel, A Partial History of Lost Causes, was published by The Dial Press in March 2012.

C.J. Hribal is the author of the novel The Company Car, which received the Anne Powers Book Award, and the novel American Beauty.  He’s also the author of the short fiction collections Matty’s Heart and The Clouds in Memphis, which won the AWP Award for Short Fiction, and he edited The Boundaries of Twilight: Czecho-Slovak Writing from the New World. He has held Fellowships from the NEA, the Bush, and from the Guggenheim Foundations, and has twice won the Sternig Award for Short Fiction.  He is the Louise Edna Goeden Professor of English at Marquette University, and is a member of the fiction faculty at the Warren Wilson College MFA Program for Writers.

Kara Levy

Kara Levy’s fiction appears in Alaska Quarterly Review, Mississippi Review Prize Issue 2009, TriQuarterly, Zen Monster, Drunken Boat, the Huffington Post, and Narrative, where she was a winner of the 30Below Prize for writers under 30. A graduate of the MFA program at Columbia University, she was a recent Steinbeck Fellow in Fiction at the Center for Steinbeck Studies in San Jose. She lives in San Francisco.

Wendy Merrill

Wendy Merrill’s memoir, Falling into Manholes: The Memoir of a Bad/Good Girl (Putnam 2008), was sold at the Maui Writers Conference in 2006. Her personal essays also appear in the anthology Single Woman of a Certain Age (Inner Ocean, 2006) and, Single State of the Union (Seal Press, 2007). She is described by Anne Lamott as “a wonderful new voice — smart, funny, and wildly real.” She founded WAM Marketing Group, a unique marketing communications company based in Sausalito, where she currently lives above ground and beyond her means.

Frances Stroh

Frances Stroh is an installation artist turned writer who lived and worked in London for two years on a Fulbright Grant. She is writing a memoir entitled “Fire-Brewed: The Fall of the Stroh’s Beer Family” about her family who made beer in Detroit for a hundred and fifty years. Her work has appeared in Rosebud and on her blog, Irritable Brain Syndrome. She struggles mightily to employ Twitter in creative ways but enjoys the process.



October 14 Reading: Flight

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on September 18, 2010

Flight is the theme for the October 14 reading. 7 PM, Studio 333. $5.  You won’t want to miss the following authors read from their work.

Elizabeth Bernstein

Elizabeth Bernstein is the founder and editor of The Big Ugly Review, an online literary magazine that showcases fiction, nonfiction, poetry, photography, music, and short films. Her short stories have been published or are forthcoming in the Los Angeles Times Sunday magazine, the San Francisco Bay Guardian (fiction contest winner), Eleven Eleven magazine, the North Atlantic Review, and other US and international literary journals. Her plays have been produced in several venues, including the Exit Theater, The PlayGround, Impact Theatre, and Fringe of Marin. She works out of the San Francisco Writers Grotto, where she edits books and teaches short story workshops.

Ianthe Brautigan

Ianthe Brautigan. I was born in San Francisco at the tail end of the Beat Era, so I feel fortunate to remember a quieter, less crowded, more artistic city; however, San Francisco will always have a special place in my heart. Now I live in Northern California with my daughter, and my husband, Paul Swensen, who is a producer, director, and amateur chef. We love to have friends come to our house to eat, laugh, and tell stories.

Recently, I had a serious brush with ill health, which changed my prospective on life. Lolly, my little dog, and I spent months sitting quietly together and going for little walks because I was too sick to do much else. (She is lying next to me as I write this.) With lots of help from wonderful doctors and my family and friends, I got well. I am very lucky. Now I am trying all sorts of new things, I am finishing up a novel and working on a documentary with my husband. My memoir, You Can’t Catch Death (St. Martins Press) has been translated into Swedish, German, and Russian, as well as, being optioned by a major motion picture company. I have also been published in Confrontation, The Antioch Review, and other publications. I teach at Sonoma State University in Hutchins, and at Santa Rosa Junior College.

Andrew Sean Greer

Andrew Sean Greer is the bestselling author of four works of fiction, most recently The Story of a Marriage, which The New York Times has called an “inspired, lyrical novel.” He is the recipient of the PEN/O’Henry Prize for Short Fiction, the Northern California Book Award, the California Book Award, the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Public Library. Greer currently lives in San Francisco, at work on his next novel.

Other titles include: How It Was For Me (2000), The Path of Minor Planets (2001), and The Confessions of Max Tivoli (2004), as well as the following anthologies: PEN O. Henry Prize Stories 2009, Best American Nonrequired Reading 2008, The Book Of Other People, and The Show I’ll Never Forget.

Scott Landers

Scott Landers is a graduate of the MFA program in Creative Writing at San Francisco State University. His short stories have appeared in a number of small literary journals. His debut novel, Coswell’s Guide to Tambralinga, was published by Farrar, Straus, and Giroux in 2004, and sold well over 15 copies. Currently he works as a technical writer and instructional designer, and lives, with great trepidation, in north Sonoma County.

Janet Thornburg

Janet Thornburg’s short stories have appeared in Carve Magazine, The Distillery, In The Family, Lumina, The MacGuffin, Phantasmagoria, and Phoebe. Rhubarb Pie, a collection of her short stories, was published by Thunderegg Press in 2005. In addition to writing fiction, she has written and performed seven solo shows, and her poetry has appeared in Womanthology, A Collection of Colorado Women Poets and Most of the Holes are Occupied:  A Santa Fe Anthology. She lives with her two children in San Francisco, where she teaches at City College.

Olga Zilberbourg

Olga Zilberbourg. I am a fiction writer and editor traveling between San Francisco, CA and St. Petersburg, Russia. My second Russian-language collection of stories was published in September 2010 by St. Petersburg-based Limbus Press. In English, my stories have appeared in Narrative Magazine, Alligator Juniper, J Journal and other publications. I am an associate editor at Narrative Magazine and a regular participant of San Francisco Writers Workshop. I blog about travel and writing on my website.

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