Why There Are Words

Why There Are Words April 12: “Break”

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on March 10, 2012

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents the following readers on the theme: Break April 12 at Studio 333 in Sausalito, 7-9pm. $5. Break: an interruption in continuity; a second chance. These seven authors will BREAK through what we think we know about this topic. Join us! And don’t forget to subscribe to our newsletter announcing upcoming readings each month. (We never share your email with anyone!)

 

 

Shannon Cain

Shannon Cain’s debut short story collection, The Necessity of Certain Behaviors, is the recipient of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize. Her stories have been awarded the Pushcart Prize, the O. Henry Prize, and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. They have appeared or are forthcoming in Tin House, The Colorado Review, the New England Review, American Short Fiction, Mid-American Review, and Southwords: New Writing from Ireland. She is the co-editor, with Lisa Bowden, of Powder: Writing by Women in the Ranks, from Vietnam to Iraq (Kore Press, 2008) and co-adapter of Coming In Hot, the stage adaptation of the book. She is the Artist-in-Residence for the City of Tucson’s Ward One and the fiction editor for Kore Press. Her current creative project is Tucson, the Novel: An Experiment in Literature and Civil Discourse.

 

 

Stan Goldberg

Stan Goldberg is the author of Lessons for the Living: Stories of Forgiveness,Gratitude, and Courage at the End of Life, which received six national and international awards and was translated into Chinese, Indonesian, and Portuguese. He has published seven books, written numerous articles, and delivered more than 100 lectures and workshops throughout the United States, Latin America, Canada, and Asia on topics ranging from change, to flyfishing, to end of life issues.  He is Professor Emeritus at San Francisco State University, and devotee of the shakuhachi (Japanese bamboo flute) and Native American Flute. In 2009 he was named Volunteer of the Year by the Hospice Volunteer Association.

 

 

Leo Litwalk

Leo Litwak’s novel Waiting for the News received the National Jewish Book Award and the Edward Lewis Wallant Award. He has published two novels and two works of nonfiction. His work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, New York Times Book Review, Esquire, Look Magazine, and Best American Short Stories. He is a recipient of John Simon Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and first prize in the 1990 O. Henry Prize Stories collection. Professor at San Francisco State University for more than thirty years, he lives in San Francisco.

 

 

Meredith Maran

Meredith Maran is a book critic, award-winning journalist, and the author of several bestselling nonfiction books including My Lie, Class Dismissed, and What It’s Like to Live Now. A member of the National Book Critics Circle, she reviews books for People, Salon, the San Francisco Chronicle, and the Boston Globe, and writes for a number of magazines. Since publishing a poem at age six in Highlights for Kids, she’s dreamed of publishing her first novel. A Theory of Small Earthquakes is it.

 

 

Sommer Schafer

Sommer Schafer is a candidate in the MFA program at San Francisco State University. She lives in San Rafael and is currently working on two collections of stories: My Father’s Memoirs, about a family coming to terms with a father’s mental illness and subsequent death, and Hope, about the citizens of a small town in Alaska. You can read her first publication, “The Table,” forthcoming later this year in Barge Journal.

 

 

Linda Gray Sexton

Linda Gray Sexton has published several widely acclaimed novels as well as two memoirs about her life and relationship with her mother, Pulitzer Prize winning poet Anne Sexton. Her first memoir, Searching for Mercy Street: My Journey Back To My Mother, was named a New York Times Book Review Notable Book. Her recent memoir, Half in Love: Surviving the Legacy of Suicide, is about her struggle with her own mental illness and the legacy of suicide left to her by her mother, who took her own life when Sexton was twenty-one. Unlike her mother’s story though, hers is a story of triumph. She lives in Northern California.

 

 

Mary Paynter Sherwin

Mary Paynter Sherwin’s work has appeared most recently in The Midway Journal, Drash: Northwest Mosaic, and Unswept. She was also recently named one of the Northwest’s most innovative poets by Rattapallax. Mary is pursuing an MFA at Saint Mary’s College of California and lives in Oakland with her husband, David.

November 11 reading; theme is Journey

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on October 23, 2010

Join us  November 11 at Studio 333 7 PM when the following authors will read from their work on the theme of “journey.” ($5) Come early — seats fill up fast; bring money for beverages and for authors’ books.

Zoe Fitzgerald Carter

Zoe FitzGerald Carter is a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and has written for numerous publications including The New York Observer, Premiere, Salon, and the San Francisco Chronicle. Imperfect Endings is her first memoir. It won first place in the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association’s literary contest and was a finalist at The San Francisco Writer’s Conference. It was excerpted in O magazine and is a Barnes & Nobel Discover Great New Writer’s pick. She lives in Northern California with her husband and two daughters and is currently at work on a novel.

Thaisa Frank has written three books of fiction, including A Brief History of

Thaisa Frank

Camouflage and Sleeping in Velvet (both with Black Sparrow Press, now acquired by David Godine). She has co-authored a work of nonfiction, Finding Your Writers Voice: A Guide to Creative Fiction, which is used in MFA programs.  Her novel Heidegger’s Glasses is coming out this fall with Counterpoint Press.  Foreign rights have been sold to Holland, Norway, Italy, Spain, France, Portugal, Brazil and Poland. She has taught in the graduate programs at San Francisco State, the University of San Francisco, been on the staff of various summer writing workshops, and written essays, including a recent Afterward in Viking/Penguin’s new edition of Voltaire.

Mimi Herman

Mimi Herman is the author of The Art of Learning (NC Arts Council), and has published poetry, stories and articles in magazines and newspapers throughout the country. She is the North Carolina Poetry Out Loud Coordinator, and an associate editor for Teaching Artist Journal. She has worked as an arts and education consultant since 1990, engaging over 25,000 students and teachers with writing residencies, as well as providing extensive professional development for teachers and teaching artists. She has an MFA from the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers. Mimi does her own carpentry and plumbing, and can milk a cow and a goat, though not at the same time.

Skip Horack is the author of the story collection The Southern Cross and

Skip Horack

the novel The Eden Hunter. He is currently a Jones Lecturer at Stanford, where he was also a Wallace Stegner Fellow. A native of Louisiana, and a graduate of Florida State University, he now lives in the Bay Area.

Meredith Maran

Meredith Maran is an award-winning journalist and the author of ten books, most recently My Lie: A True Story of False Memory (September 2010), featured on The Joy Behar Show, multiple NPR programs, and reviewed by the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, People, Salon, More Magazine, among others. Her work also appears in anthologies, newspapers, and magazines including People, Self, Family Circle, More, Mother Jones, San Francisco Chronicle, and Salon.com. A member of the National Book Critics Circle, she lives with her wife in Oakland, California.

Cary Tennis graduated from the University of Miami with a degree in literature

Cary Tennis

and journalism and entered the masters program in creative writing at San Francisco State, where he passed his orals (Wallace Stevens, William Faulkner and Vladimir Nabokov) and had his creative thesis approved but got distracted and never actually got the degree. He formed a band called the Repeat Offenders, worked as a rock journalist for the SF Weekly and generally tried to live out some idiosyncratic version of the poet and fiction writer as brilliant urban scold throughout most of the 80s. Salon hired him in 1999 as a copy editor; in 2001 he took over the advice column from Garrison Keillor and has been writing that ever since. He also runs a small publishing house, organizes writing retreats, and conducts weekly writing workshops. His latest book is Since You Asked: The Best of Salon.com’s Cary Tennis.

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