Why There Are Words

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents “After All”

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on June 18, 2012

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents the following readers on the theme After All July 12 at Studio 333 in Sausalito, 7-9pm. $5. Join us as seven authors share stories big and small. It’s why there are words after all!

Lauren Becker

Lauren Becker is editor of Corium Magazine. Her work has appeared in The Los Angeles Review, Opium, Hobart, Juked and some other nice places. Her collection of short fiction is included in the anthology Shut Up/Look Pretty (Tiny Hardcore Press, 2012). She lives in Oakland, where she hosts the reading series, East Bay on the Brain. She has never been nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Joe Clifford

Joe Clifford’s work has appeared in Big Bridge, the Connecticut Review, Drunken Boat, Fringe, Opium, Thuglit, Word Riot, and Underground Voices, among others. A collection of short stories, Choice Cuts, and his noir novel Wake the Undertaker will be published by Snubnose Press this year. He is the producer of Lip Service West, a “gritty, real, raw” reading series in Oakland. He has been to jail but never prison.

Sere Prince Halverson

Sere Prince Halverson is the author of The Underside of Joy (Dutton, January 2012), translated into fifteen languages. She worked as a copywriter and creative director for 20 years while she wrote fiction and raised kids. She and her husband have four children, and live in Northern California.

Joy Lanzendorfer

Joy Lanzendorfer’s work has appeared in Hotel Amerika, Necessary Fiction, Word Riot, Salon, the San Francisco Chronicle, Entrepreneur, Bust, and others. She completed an MA in Creative Writing at San Francisco State University, where she served on the editorial board for Fourteen Hills. Her chapbook The End of the World as I Know It won runner-up for the Michael Rubin Chapbook Award at SFSU. For the last five years, she has been a judge in the Writer’s Digest Self-Published Book Awards. She just completed her first novel.

Ericka Lutz

Ericka Lutz is the author of the recently published novel The Edge of Maybe. Her seven non-fiction books include On the Go with Baby and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Stepparenting, and her short fiction and creative non-fiction have appeared in numerous books, anthologies, and journals, including Literary Mama, Because I Love Her, Paris: A Love Story, and Green Mountains Review. She won the Boston Fiction Festival in 2006 with her story “Deer Story,” and was a two-time fellow at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Her full-length solo show “A Widow’s To-Do List” is in development. She teaches writing at U.C. Berkeley. She is currently writing a second novel based in Oakland about family ties… but this one has ghosts.

Aimee Phan

Aimee Phan is the author of The Reeducation of Cherry Truong (St. Martin’s Press, March 2012). Her first book, We Should Never Meet, was awarded the Association for Asian American Studies Book Award in Prose, a Notable Book by the Kiryama Prize in fiction, and a finalist for the Asian American Literary Awards. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, and The Oregonian, among others. A 2010 National Endowment of the Arts Creative Writing Fellow, she received her MFA from the University of Iowa, where she won a Maytag Fellowship. She teaches in the MFA Program in Writing and Writing and Literature Program at California College of the Arts.

Eric Sasson

Eric Sasson’s story collection Margins of Tolerance (Livingston Press, May 2012) was the 2011 Tartt First Fiction Award runner-up. His story “Floating” was a finalist for the Robert Olen Butler prize. Other publication credits include Explosion Proof, BLOOM, Nashville Review, The Puritan, Liquid Imagination, Alligator Juniper, Trans, The Ledge, MARY magazine, and THE2NDHAND, among others. He’s taught fiction writing at the Sackett Street Writers Workshop and lives in Brooklyn.


Why There Are Words November 10: Witness

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on October 18, 2011

The month of October brought all kinds of literary goodness, both in Sausalito and San Francisco as part of Litquake. Can one simultaneously be recovering and ready for more? Are you? The theme is Witness, and we’ll be in Sausalito’s Studio 333 at 7 PM, November 10, with books, beer, wine, and blame!  $5 is all you need to witness.

 

W. Ross Ayers

W. Ross Ayers is a writer and entrepreneur. He founded and runs the San Francisco Writers Community and co-publishing studio. He likes bad beer, bad bourbon, and clove cigarettes, and lives in and loves San Francisco. His book Blood, Guns and Whores – An All American Tale of a Boy and His Dog is a “coffee table novel” of micro chapters and illustrations.

Jasmin Darznik was born in Tehran, Iran.  A former attorney, she

Jasmin Darznik

received her Ph.D. from Princeton University.  Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and other publications.  She is a professor of English at Washington and Lee University and has also been a visiting professor of Iranian literature at the University of Virginia.  The Good Daughter is her first book and will be published in twelve countries.

 

Albert Flynn DeSilver

Albert Flynn DeSilver is an internationally published poet, an artist, publisher, and founder of The Visionary Writers MFA. He served as Marin County’s first poet laureate from 2008-2010. For many years he taught as a California Poet in the Schools, and currently works in the Teen and Family program at Spirit Rock Meditation Center, and is the CEO of a Homecare Agency in Napa and Sonoma Counties. His most recent work is a memoir titled “Beamish Boy,” which chronicles his spiritual journey, from violence and self-annihilation to self-realization, creativity, and a life in poetry and writing. He lives in Woodacre, California.

Pam Houston is the award-winning author of Cowboys Are My Weakness,

Pam Houston

Waltzing the Cat, A Little More About Me, and Sight Hound. Her stories have been selected for the Best American Short Stories, the O. Henry Awards, the Pushcart Prize, and the Best American Short Stories of the Century. Pam teaches in the graduate writing program at University of California, Davis. Her new collection of short stories, Contents May Have Shifted, is forthcoming in 2012.

 

Joshua Mohr

Joshua Mohr is the author of the novels Termite Parade, which was an Editors’ Choice on The New York Times Best Seller List; Some Things that Meant the World to Me, one of O Magazine‘s Top 10 reads of 2009 and a SF Chronicle bestseller; and the brand new Damascus (October 2011).  He has published numerous short stories and essays in publications such as The New York Times Book Review, 7×7, the Bay Guardian, ZYZZYVA, The Rumpus, among many others.  He lives in San Francisco and teaches in the MFA program at the University of San Francisco.

Linda Joy Myers is the author of The Power of Memoir—How

Linda Joy Myers

to Write Your Healing Story, Becoming Whole, and the award-winning memoir Don’t Call Me Mother, which won the BAPIA Gold Medal prize. She has won prizes for fiction, memoir and poetry: First Prize, Jessamyn West Fiction Contest; Finalist, San Francisco Writing Contest for Secret Music, a novel about the Kindertransport; First Prize, poetry, East of Eden Contest, and for memoir writing First Prize Carol Landauer Life Writing Contest. Hernext book is Truth or Lie: On the Cusp of Memoir and Fiction. The founder of the National Association of Memoir Writers and co-President of the Women’s National Book Association, she is an instructor at Writers Digest and gives workshops nationally and online.

 

Tracy Winn

Tracy Winn’s linked story collection, Mrs. Somebody Somebody won the 2010 Sherwood Anderson Foundation Fellowship, and was a finalist for the Julia Ward Howe Award and the Massachusetts Book Awards. Her stories have appeared most recently in Alaska Quarterly Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, and New Orleans Review. A Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers graduate, she is the recipient of grants and fellowships from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the Arch and Bruce Brown Foundation, and the MacDowell and Millay Colonies.

July 14: Culpable

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on June 14, 2011

Last month’s reading was stunning!  But summer at Why There Are Words is just warming up, and July promises to be intriguing, as the following authors read from their work on the theme of “Culpable.”  We’ll be in Sausalito’s Studio 333 at 7 PM, with books, beer, wine, and blame!  $5 is all you need to come join us.

Graham Gremore

Graham Gremore is a reclusive misanthrope from St. Paul. He co-produces the humor reading series LitUp Writers in San Francisco. Graham has written two stage musicals, both of which were commissioned and produced by SteppingStone Theater in St. Paul. In 2009, his play “As in Autumn” was a semi-finalist in The Source: 10 Minute Play Festival in Washington D.C. His solo show, “Private Parts,” had its world premiere at SF Playhouse in May 2011. Currently, he is an MFA candidate in Creative Writing with an emphasis in Playwriting at San Francisco State University.

Agatha Hoff

A child of World War II, Agatha Hoff describes the violent destruction of a city, a country and the culture of her native Hungary in her book, Burning Horses. She came to America in 1949 as a refugee, attended high school in Menlo Park, and college at Seattle University. When her youngest child started kindergarten, Agatha went to San Francisco Law School and earned her J.D. degree at night. She worked in poverty law where clients often abandoned her for a “real lawyer,” meaning someone they paid. When she became a real lawyer in private practice, her clients termed her personal injury practice “the armpit of the law.” When she was appointed a court commissioner at San Francisco Superior Court, her favorite moniker written by a disgruntled litigant pronounced her to be a “fascist terrorist cross-dressed in the cloak of justice.” When at last a British tourist who came to traffic court called her “Your Worship,” she thought she’d retire before it went to her head. Agatha is spending her retirement writing and long distance cycling. Her column, “Tales From The Bench”, has appeared regularly in San Francisco Attorney Magazine.

Evan Karp

Evan Karp covers literary culture as a columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle and is a regular contributor to SF Weekly‘s Exhibitionist blog. He is the founder and editor of Litseen and creator and host of Quiet Lightning, a monthly submission-based reading series that publishes each show as a book called sparkle & blink, which he also edits. He is a contributing editor of Instant City and the official blogger of Litquake.

K. M. Soehnlein

K.M. Soehnlein is the author of three novels: Robin and Ruby, The World of Normal Boys, and You Can Say You Knew Me When, plus essays and reviews in many publications. He was born in New York, grew up in New Jersey, and has lived in San Francisco since the early ’90s. He teaches in the MFA in Writing Program at the University of San Francisco. His wish list includes learning to play the piano, becoming fluent in Italian, and finishing the New York Times Sunday Crossword puzzle in under 45 minutes.

Kristen Tracy

Kristen Tracy is a poet who has also written several teen and middle-grade novels, including Camille McPhee Fell Under the Bus, Lost It, Sharks & Boys, and A Field Guide for Heartbreakers. She lives in San Francisco where she volunteers as a gardener on Alcatraz. Along with Nina LaCour she teaches Bay Area writing classes.

James Warner

James Warner is the author of All Her Father’s Guns, a novel published in 2011 by Numina Press. His short fiction has appeared most recently on KGB Bar Lit Magazine, Narrative, and Night Train. He writes an almost-monthly literary column, “Standing Perpendicular,” for opendemocracy.net, and is also a fiction editor for Identity Theory.


Why There Are Words Presents at Litquake’s Litcrawl Oct. 9

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on September 4, 2010

Please chLitquake logoeck out the info on the page listed over there in the sidebar for Why There Are Words Presents at Litquake’s Litcrawl event. Tom Barbash, Catherine Brady, Alice LaPlante, Li Miao Lovett, Valerie Miner, and Jason Roberts. Oct. 9, 6-7 PM at Artzone 461 Gallery at 461 Valencia St., SF. You won’t want to miss this!

January 14 Readers

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on December 4, 2009

Why There Are Words is thrilled to have the following readers kick off the reading series: Tamim Ansary, Shana Mahaffey, Scott James, Mari Coates, Michael Alenyikov, and Gravity Goldberg.

The theme is “Different Year, Different Worlds.” Come hear what these writers have to say about that. The reading series will kick off Thursday, January 14, 7 PM, at the wonderful Studio 333 on Caledonia Street in Sausalito, $5 donation at the door. Books will be available for purchase and for signing by the authors.

Readers’ bios

Tamim Ansary

Tamim Ansary

Afghan-born Tamim Ansary’s best-selling books include Destiny Disrupted: A History of the World Through Islamic Eyes and West of Kabul, East of New York (which of its many honors was also named the One City One Book selection for the city of San Francisco).  His new novel The Widow’s Husband is now available at online bookstores.  As a longtime columnist for the Microsoft learning site, encarta.com, Ansary wrote about education, democracy, the social effects of technology, and other social and cultural issues. He directs the San Francisco Writers Workshop and teaches sporadically through the Osher Institute of Lifelong Learning at San Francisco State and at U.C. Berkeley. Ansary moved to the United States in 1964 at the age of 16. Today he lives in San Francisco with his wife and two cats.

Shana Mahaffey

Shana Mahaffey

Shana  Mahaffey lives in San Francisco, California, in part of an Edwardian compound that she shares with an informal cooperative of family, friends, and five cats.  She’s a survivor of catechism and cat scratch fever, and is a member of the Sanchez Grotto Annex, a writers’ co-op.  Her recent debut novel, Sounds Like Crazy, has received much acclaim, including nomination for the Northern California Independent Booksellers Book Awards. She welcomes all visitors to her website and is happy to meet with book groups in-person or in cyberspace (phone/webcam/the works).

Scott James

Scott James

Scott James is a columnist for The New York Times and three-time Emmy Award winner for his work in television news. He is also a novelist, writing fiction under the pen name Kemble Scott. His debut book SoMa was the first novel launched using YouTube, and his second The Sower was the first novel sold by giant social publisher Scribd.com. Both books became bestsellers.

Michael Alenyikov

Michael Alenyikov

Michael Alenyikov’s fiction and essays have appeared in The Georgia Review, Descant, The James White Review, Modern Words, New York Stories, and The Gay & Lesbian Review. The title story to his forthcoming book, “Ivan & Misha: A Novel In Stories” (Northwestern University Press, fall, 2010), was a 2007 Pushcart Nominee, and  was anthologized in Best Gay Stories, 2008, Lethe  Press, and Tartts Four: Incisive Fiction from Emerging Writers, Livingston Press. He’s paid the rent by means of various occupations, including bookstore clerk, psychologist, cab driver, and freelancer writer. Born in the Bronx, he now lives in San Francisco.

Mari Coates

Mari Coates

Mari Coates is a writer living in San Francisco. Before turning to fiction, she wrote on theater, film, and the arts for many Bay Area publications and was principal theater critic for the SF Weekly. She earned her MFA from the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers and currently produces jacket and promotional copy for UC Press, Berkeley, California.

Gravity Goldberg is co-founder and co-editor of Instant City: A Literary Exploration of San Francisco. Over the years, her writing has appeared in places like Watchword, SFBG, Stretcher, SFGate, Kitchen Sink and other print publications.  She teaches creative writing to awesome adults through the San Francisco City College extended education program. For the fourth year, Gravity will be festival manager for Litquake. She lives in the Mission District with her cat and boyfriend.

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