Why There Are Words

Why There Are Words Presents Treasure, Sept. 11, 2014

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on August 18, 2014

Join Why There Are Words on September 11 at Studio 333 in Sausalito with the following treasured authors reading on the theme “Treasure.” Doors open at 7pm; readings begin at 7:15. $10.

Faith Adiele

Faith Adiele

Faith Adiele is the author of Meeting Faith, a memoir about becoming Thailand’s first black Buddhist nun, which won the PEN Beyond Margins Award; writer/narrator/subject of My Journey Home, a PBS documentary about her international family; and co-editor of Coming of Age Around the World: A Multicultural Anthology. A graduate of Harvard University, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and the Iowa Nonfiction Writing Program, she has been profiled in periodicals like Yes!, Marie Claire, and O: The Oprah Magazine. A popular MC and speaker, she lives in Oakland and teaches at California College of the Arts, The San Francisco Writers’ Grotto, and VONA Summer Workshops for Writers of Color. She recently published The Nigerian-Nordic Girl’s Guide To Lady Problems.

Lucy Corin

Lucy Corin

Lucy Corin is the author of the short story collections One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses (McSweeney’s Books), and The Entire Predicament (Tin House Books) and the novel Everyday Psychokillers: A History for Girls (FC2). Stories have appeared in American Short Fiction, Conjunctions, Ploughshares, Tin House Magazine, and elsewhere. She’s been a fellow at Breadloaf and Sewanee, and spent 2012-13 at the American Academy in Rome as the John Guare Fellow in Literature.

ali eAli Eteraz grew up speaking Spanish in the Dominican Republic; moved to Pakistan where he attended both a rural madrassa and a Catholic school; and eventually arrived in Brooklyn, from where he moved to eleven more states, ending up in California. Currently an inhabitant of the San Francisco Writer’s Grotto, he is the author of the short story collection Falsipedies and Fibsiennes (Guernica Ed), and the darkly comic memoir Children of Dust (HarperCollins), which received Honorable Mention at the San Francisco Book Festival. This year he won the 3QD Arts & Literature Prize judged by novelist and NYTimes book columnist Mohsin Hamid. This summer Eteraz’s short story about migrant laborers in the Persian Gulf was published by the Chicago Quarterly Review.

Mary-Rose Hayes

Mary-Rose Hayes

Mary-Rose Hayes is the author of nine novels, most recently What She Had to Do, and include the TIME/LIFE bestseller Amethyst and two political thrillers co-authored with Senator Barbara Boxer. Her books have been translated into sixteen languages. She has published short stories and articles in England and the US, and has written an original screenplay for legendary movie star Lana Turner. She has worked as a script editor for Thames Television, London, and as Associate Editor for Pacific News Service, San Francisco, and taught creative writing at the University of California, Berkeley; Arizona State University; the Squaw Valley Community of Writers at Lake Tahoe; and for the past five years has been co-director of an annual writers’ retreat in Tuscany, Italy.

Zahra Noorbakhsh

Zahra Noorbakhsh

 

 

 

Zahra Noorbakhsh is a comedian, writer, and actor. The New Yorker Magazine dubbed her one-woman show “All Atheists Are Muslim” a highlight of the Int’l New York City Fringe Theater Festival. Zahra is also a contributor to the NY Times Featured anthology, “Love Inshallah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women.” She’s currently touring her newest solo-show “Hijab and Hammerpants.” Zahra is a member of the SF Writer’s Grotto and teaches courses there in storytelling, and comedy.

Angela Pneuman

Angela Pneuman

Angela Pnueman, raised in Kentucky, is a former Stegner Fellow and teaches fiction writing at Stanford University. Her work has been included in The Best American Short Stories, the Virginia Quarterly ReviewPloughshares, and elsewhere. Her widely praised story collection, Home Remedies, was hailed as “call[ing] to mind Alice Munro” by the San Francisco Chronicle. Her most recent book is the novel Lay It on My Heart (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). She lives in Chicago and in the Bay Area of California.

Linda Gray Sexton

Linda Gray Sexton

Linda Gray Sexton is daughter of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Anne Sexton. She has written four novels and two memoirs, Half in Love: Surviving the Legacy of Suicide and Searching for Mercy Street, both published by Counterpoint. Her latest is Bespotted: My Family’s Love Affair With Thirty-Eight Dalmatians.

Renee Swindle

Renee Swindle

Renee Swindle is the author of Please Please Please ( Dial Press/Random House) and Shake Down the Stars (NAL Trad / 2013). She earned her BA in English from UC Irvine and an MFA in Creative Writing from San Diego State University. She’s lived in Oakland, CA for the last fourteen years with her three rescue dogs and three cats. Swindle’s newest novel, A Pinch of Ooh La La, will be released on August 5, 2014 by New American Library.

Why There Are Words takes place every second Thursday of the month, when people come from San Francisco, the North Bay, the East Bay–everywhere–to crowd the house. The brainchild of Peg Alford Pursell, this literary goodness has been going strong into its fifth year.

Why There Are Words April 12: “Break”

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on March 10, 2012

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents the following readers on the theme: Break April 12 at Studio 333 in Sausalito, 7-9pm. $5. Break: an interruption in continuity; a second chance. These seven authors will BREAK through what we think we know about this topic. Join us! And don’t forget to subscribe to our newsletter announcing upcoming readings each month. (We never share your email with anyone!)

 

 

Shannon Cain

Shannon Cain’s debut short story collection, The Necessity of Certain Behaviors, is the recipient of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize. Her stories have been awarded the Pushcart Prize, the O. Henry Prize, and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. They have appeared or are forthcoming in Tin House, The Colorado Review, the New England Review, American Short Fiction, Mid-American Review, and Southwords: New Writing from Ireland. She is the co-editor, with Lisa Bowden, of Powder: Writing by Women in the Ranks, from Vietnam to Iraq (Kore Press, 2008) and co-adapter of Coming In Hot, the stage adaptation of the book. She is the Artist-in-Residence for the City of Tucson’s Ward One and the fiction editor for Kore Press. Her current creative project is Tucson, the Novel: An Experiment in Literature and Civil Discourse.

 

 

Stan Goldberg

Stan Goldberg is the author of Lessons for the Living: Stories of Forgiveness,Gratitude, and Courage at the End of Life, which received six national and international awards and was translated into Chinese, Indonesian, and Portuguese. He has published seven books, written numerous articles, and delivered more than 100 lectures and workshops throughout the United States, Latin America, Canada, and Asia on topics ranging from change, to flyfishing, to end of life issues.  He is Professor Emeritus at San Francisco State University, and devotee of the shakuhachi (Japanese bamboo flute) and Native American Flute. In 2009 he was named Volunteer of the Year by the Hospice Volunteer Association.

 

 

Leo Litwalk

Leo Litwak’s novel Waiting for the News received the National Jewish Book Award and the Edward Lewis Wallant Award. He has published two novels and two works of nonfiction. His work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, New York Times Book Review, Esquire, Look Magazine, and Best American Short Stories. He is a recipient of John Simon Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and first prize in the 1990 O. Henry Prize Stories collection. Professor at San Francisco State University for more than thirty years, he lives in San Francisco.

 

 

Meredith Maran

Meredith Maran is a book critic, award-winning journalist, and the author of several bestselling nonfiction books including My Lie, Class Dismissed, and What It’s Like to Live Now. A member of the National Book Critics Circle, she reviews books for People, Salon, the San Francisco Chronicle, and the Boston Globe, and writes for a number of magazines. Since publishing a poem at age six in Highlights for Kids, she’s dreamed of publishing her first novel. A Theory of Small Earthquakes is it.

 

 

Sommer Schafer

Sommer Schafer is a candidate in the MFA program at San Francisco State University. She lives in San Rafael and is currently working on two collections of stories: My Father’s Memoirs, about a family coming to terms with a father’s mental illness and subsequent death, and Hope, about the citizens of a small town in Alaska. You can read her first publication, “The Table,” forthcoming later this year in Barge Journal.

 

 

Linda Gray Sexton

Linda Gray Sexton has published several widely acclaimed novels as well as two memoirs about her life and relationship with her mother, Pulitzer Prize winning poet Anne Sexton. Her first memoir, Searching for Mercy Street: My Journey Back To My Mother, was named a New York Times Book Review Notable Book. Her recent memoir, Half in Love: Surviving the Legacy of Suicide, is about her struggle with her own mental illness and the legacy of suicide left to her by her mother, who took her own life when Sexton was twenty-one. Unlike her mother’s story though, hers is a story of triumph. She lives in Northern California.

 

 

Mary Paynter Sherwin

Mary Paynter Sherwin’s work has appeared most recently in The Midway Journal, Drash: Northwest Mosaic, and Unswept. She was also recently named one of the Northwest’s most innovative poets by Rattapallax. Mary is pursuing an MFA at Saint Mary’s College of California and lives in Oakland with her husband, David.

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