Why There Are Words

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents “After All”

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on June 18, 2012

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents the following readers on the theme After All July 12 at Studio 333 in Sausalito, 7-9pm. $5. Join us as seven authors share stories big and small. It’s why there are words after all!

Lauren Becker

Lauren Becker is editor of Corium Magazine. Her work has appeared in The Los Angeles Review, Opium, Hobart, Juked and some other nice places. Her collection of short fiction is included in the anthology Shut Up/Look Pretty (Tiny Hardcore Press, 2012). She lives in Oakland, where she hosts the reading series, East Bay on the Brain. She has never been nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Joe Clifford

Joe Clifford’s work has appeared in Big Bridge, the Connecticut Review, Drunken Boat, Fringe, Opium, Thuglit, Word Riot, and Underground Voices, among others. A collection of short stories, Choice Cuts, and his noir novel Wake the Undertaker will be published by Snubnose Press this year. He is the producer of Lip Service West, a “gritty, real, raw” reading series in Oakland. He has been to jail but never prison.

Sere Prince Halverson

Sere Prince Halverson is the author of The Underside of Joy (Dutton, January 2012), translated into fifteen languages. She worked as a copywriter and creative director for 20 years while she wrote fiction and raised kids. She and her husband have four children, and live in Northern California.

Joy Lanzendorfer

Joy Lanzendorfer’s work has appeared in Hotel Amerika, Necessary Fiction, Word Riot, Salon, the San Francisco Chronicle, Entrepreneur, Bust, and others. She completed an MA in Creative Writing at San Francisco State University, where she served on the editorial board for Fourteen Hills. Her chapbook The End of the World as I Know It won runner-up for the Michael Rubin Chapbook Award at SFSU. For the last five years, she has been a judge in the Writer’s Digest Self-Published Book Awards. She just completed her first novel.

Ericka Lutz

Ericka Lutz is the author of the recently published novel The Edge of Maybe. Her seven non-fiction books include On the Go with Baby and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Stepparenting, and her short fiction and creative non-fiction have appeared in numerous books, anthologies, and journals, including Literary Mama, Because I Love Her, Paris: A Love Story, and Green Mountains Review. She won the Boston Fiction Festival in 2006 with her story “Deer Story,” and was a two-time fellow at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Her full-length solo show “A Widow’s To-Do List” is in development. She teaches writing at U.C. Berkeley. She is currently writing a second novel based in Oakland about family ties… but this one has ghosts.

Aimee Phan

Aimee Phan is the author of The Reeducation of Cherry Truong (St. Martin’s Press, March 2012). Her first book, We Should Never Meet, was awarded the Association for Asian American Studies Book Award in Prose, a Notable Book by the Kiryama Prize in fiction, and a finalist for the Asian American Literary Awards. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, and The Oregonian, among others. A 2010 National Endowment of the Arts Creative Writing Fellow, she received her MFA from the University of Iowa, where she won a Maytag Fellowship. She teaches in the MFA Program in Writing and Writing and Literature Program at California College of the Arts.

Eric Sasson

Eric Sasson’s story collection Margins of Tolerance (Livingston Press, May 2012) was the 2011 Tartt First Fiction Award runner-up. His story “Floating” was a finalist for the Robert Olen Butler prize. Other publication credits include Explosion Proof, BLOOM, Nashville Review, The Puritan, Liquid Imagination, Alligator Juniper, Trans, The Ledge, MARY magazine, and THE2NDHAND, among others. He’s taught fiction writing at the Sackett Street Writers Workshop and lives in Brooklyn.


Why There Are Words March 8: “Unspeakable”

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on February 10, 2012

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents the following authors March 8 at Studio 333 in Sausalito, 7-9pm. $5. Can the unspeakable be put into words? Come find out when these six writers take on that theme.

 

 

Chris Cole

Chris Cole’s first novel, The Speed at Which I Travel, is about an existentialist, time-traveling teenager from the Midwest. Chris Cole sits on the board of the SF literary organization Quiet Lightning, and is a co-founder of the Pints and Prose reading series. Under the name “Disembodied Poetics,” he writes a daily blog of verse and occasional prose to thousands of dedicated followers.

 

 

 

Timothy Crandle

Timothy Crandle’s fiction has been honored with the Jack Dyer Prize from Crab Orchard Review, the Waasmode Prize from Passages North,and second prize in the Zoetrope: All-Story Fiction Contest where it was selected from over 2500 entries by Joyce Carol Oates. In autumn 2010 he was writer in residence at Ox-Bow School of the Arts. He has worked as a roofer, painter (walls only, never canvases), pizza delivery man, casting director, and electrical engineer. He holds an MFA from the University of San Francisco, and lives and writes in Oakland.

 

 

Krys Lee

Krys Lee is the author of the debut novel Drifting House. Born in Seoul, South Korea, she was raised in California, and studied in the U.S. and England. A finalist for Best New American Voices in 2006, her work has appeared in The Kenyon Review, Narrative magazine, California Quarterly, Pacific Ties, the Korea Times, and Asia Weekly. She lives in Seoul.

 

 

Kate Moses

Kate Moses is the author of Cakewalk, A Memoir,nominated for a Northern California Book Award, and the internationally acclaimed, award-winning novel Wintering: A Novel of Sylvia Plath, published in fifteen languages. As a founding editor and staff writer for Salon, Kate Moses co-edited Salon’s groundbreaking daily feature Mothers Who Think and two bestselling anthologies of essays on motherhood inspired by the site, Mothers Who Think and Because I Said So. A native of San Francisco, she teaches in the creative writing programs at San Francisco State and the University of San Francisco.

 

 

Meghan Thornton

Meghan Thornton won the poetry prize at the 2010 San Francisco Writer’s Conference and was published in the Poets 11 Anthology. She is a board member of Quiet Lightning, and her poetry and short stories can be found in Sparkle & Blink. She wrote her first novel, a vampire romance, in high school. Knowing that it would never sell, she moved on to poetry. She is currently editing her novel, “The Sword in the Cellar,” the first in a middle grade fantasy series that, unfortunately, has nothing to do with vampires.

 

 

Barry Willdorf

Barry Willdorf is author of the novel, The Flight of the Sorceress. In 2001, he published a semi-autobiographical novel, Bring the War Home. His legal publishing credits include co-authoring How To Pass the LSATs,/em>, and part of the Matthew Bender series, California Forms of Jury Instructions. He was a contributing editor for Matthew Bender’s Trial Master series. Born in New York City, he grew up in Massachusetts, and claims to be the first person to have surfed on Cape Ann.

Why There Are Words February 9: “Vision”

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on January 14, 2012

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series presents the following readers on the theme: Vision February 9 at Studio 333 in Sausalito, 7-9pm. $5. Come see for yourself what all the rave reviews for the reading series have been about.


Marcus Banks

Marcus Banks finds himself at many literary gatherings.  A blogger and critic, his book reviews have appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, Prick of the Spindle, and Rain Taxi.  He has also published personal essays in Superstition Review, and from 2005-2007 was the technology columnist for the Gotham Gazette. You can follow his jottings at http://mbanks.typepad.com/.


Kirstin Chen is a 2011-2012 Steinbeck Fellow at San Jose

Kirstin Chen

State University. She has won awards from the Sewanee Writers’ Conference and Emerson College. Her stories have appeared in Hobart, Pank, Juked, The Good Men Project, and others, and have been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and the Best New American Voices anthology. She holds a BA from Stanford University and an MFA from Emerson College. She currently lives in San Francisco, where she is completing her first novel, Soy Sauce for Beginners, set in her homeland of Singapore.


Nicole McFeeley

Nicole McFeely is the author of hundreds of bar napkin scribblings and countless other incoherent jottings. She has not written a book, won a grant, or enrolled in a graduate program but has plans to do perhaps two of these things in the next ten years. Destroyer of free time, she currently works as a bartender and freelance editor and serves as the Director of Outreach for Quiet Lightning and the Assistant Editor of Litseen.com. http://nicmcfeely.wordpress.com/


Chicken John is a Showman living in San Francisco. A contributor and instigator

Chicken John

with a long history of arranging Serendipity to accommodate Chaos when she comes to Destiny’s house for dinner. He is a documented confusionist. He is a qualified insultant. He also a mechanic and a writer. He owns a gigantic bus and an odd warehouse in San Francisco. In his spare time he enjoys longs walks off a short pier, underwater basket weaving, and writing dumb bios about himself. He would like you to buy his new book, The Book of the Is. http://chickenjohn.com/

Jacqueline Luckett

Jacqueline Luckett is the author of the new novel, Passing Love. After wishin’ and hopin’ and thinkin’ and planning.’ Prayin’ and dreamin’ . . . just like that old Dusty Springfield song urges, Jacqueline Luckett finally put pen to paper and wrote, not one, but two novels. Jacqueline considers her novels great way to get a lot off her mind and to visit her favorite city, Paris. She travels frequently in search of another city that mesmerizes her as much as Paris, and is sure that when she finds it more story ideas will come her way.

Carol Sheldon

Carol Sheldon’s first novel, Mother Lode placed in the top five percent of Amazon’s International Breakthrough Novel Contest of 2011. She’s published two books of poetry. Her poetry can also be found in Robert Bly’s Great Mother Conference Anthology, Hot Flashes and Marin Poetry Anthology. Two of her plays, Sandcastles, and Lifelines were chosen for professional productions. Several other works have won awards. She holds an MA from University of Michigan, and teaches poetry, novel, and memoir writing classes. She also enjoys directing and acting, believing her experience on stage has informed her writing. http://carolsheldon.wordpress.com/


Susanna Solomon’s fiction has appeared in the online magazine Harlot’s Sauce

Susanna Solomon

Radio, in print in Vintage Voices, West Winds Centennial, and the Point Reyes Light. Her fiction lately has been inspired by entries in the Sheriff’s Calls Section of the Point Reyes Light. She is at work on a short story collection and is polishing her first novel. In cafes all over Marin, in quiet corners, she is often visited by her characters Mildred and Fred, who not only have a lot to say about what they read in the paper, but about getting older, burglars in their backyard, and uncooperative lawn chairs.


Jon Wells

Jon Wells is a designer, writer, and filmmaker living in Mill Valley. He Died All Day Long is his first novel. His design work has been recognized in venues such as the San Francisco Show, Addy Awards, Print Magazine books, and the American Institute of Graphic Arts. His first film, At the Epicenter of the Epidemic, documenting the HIV/AIDS crisis in Honduras, was shown at the Tiburon International Film Festival. He is a member of the Tuesday Night Writers and is a Squaw Valley Community of Writers alum.




Why There Are Words January 12 “Other Voices: Come Together”

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on December 9, 2011

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series celebrates its second anniversary!  Join us January 12 at Studio 333 in Sausalito, 7-9pm when we present Other Voices: Come Together and find out what all the rave reviews have been about. This will be a special show with a surprise treat. The following authors’ readings are going to be anything other than ordinary!

Anne Buelteman

Anne Buelteman’s first published work is a non-fiction essay, “The Glamorous Life,” in the anthology Single Woman of a Certain Age. You may know her from her published commentary on Susan Boyle in Huffington Post. She is currently at work on a novel about life on the national tour of a Broadway musical tentatively titled Road Kill: Tales of a National Tour. A professional actress, her acting career spans decades. She spent eleven years on the Broadway national tour of Les Miserables in North America and Asia. Most recently she appeared as the inspired eccentric Dorothea Wesbrook in the California Conservatory Theatre’s production of Eleemosynary.

Audrey Ferber

Audrey Ferber received an MFA in Writing from Mills College. Her short stories have been anthologized in Virtually Now, Eating Our Hearts Out, and An Intricate Weave. Her essays have appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, Travelers’ Tales for Women, and most recently in FRONTIERS: A Journal of Women Studies. She has written book reviews for the San Jose Mercury News and the San Francisco Chronicle. Audrey is a book group leader and teaches writing at UC Berkeley Extension. She is at work on a memoir about aging, marriage, and dance classes.

Kathi Kamen Goldmark

Kathi Kamen Goldmark is the author of the novel And My Shoes Keep Walking Back to You. She is perhaps best known in the publishing world for founding the all-author garage band, the Rock Bottom Remainders. She is also the co-author of Write That Book Already!: the Tough Love You Need to Get Published Now (with her husband Sam Barry). She has contributed essays to many books, including Mid-Life Confidential: the Rock Bottom Remainders Tour America with Three Chords and an Attitude, and My California: Journeys by Great Writers, and others. She writes the Author Enablers advice column that offers information and encouragement to aspiring authors. A 2007 San Francisco Library Laureate, Kathi was the winner of the 2008 Women’s National Book Association Award.

Seth Harwood

Seth Harwood received an MFA in fiction from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and went on to build a large fan base for his first novel, Jack Wakes Up, by first serializing it as a free audiobook. Across iTunes and sethharwood.com, his work has been downloaded over one million times. His second novel, Young Junius, is billed as “The Wire meets Cambridge, MA in 1987″ and was picked by George Pelecanos as one of his best books of 2010. Seth currently lives in San Francisco where he teaches English and creative writing at Stanford and the City College of San Francisco.

Michael David Lukas

Michael David Lukas, author of The Oracle of Stamboul (HarperCollins, 2011), has been a Fulbright Scholar in Turkey, a night-shift proofreader in Tel Aviv, and a waiter at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference in Vermont. A graduate of Brown University and the University of Maryland, his writing has appeared in VQR, Slate, National Geographic Traveler, and Georgia Review. He is also a recipient of scholarships from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Summer Writers’ Institute, Squaw Valley Community of Writers, and Elizabeth George Foundation.

Janis Cooke Newman

Janis Cooke Newman is the author of the Bay Area bestseller, Mary, a historical novel about Mary Todd Lincoln. Mary was a Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist, chosen as USA Today‘s Best Historical Fiction of the Year in 2006, and a Booksense Year-End Highlight. Newman is also the author of The Russian Word for Snow, a memoir about adopting her son from a Moscow orphanage, which was published internationally.  Her writing has appeared in numerous anthologies, as well as in several magazines, and newspapers including the NY Times, LA Times, and San Francisco Chronicle. She is a member of the SF Writers Grotto, where she works and teaches classes in creative writing.

Peter Orner

Peter Orner is the author of the brand new novel, Love and Shame and Love (November 2011, Little Brown); The Second Coming of Mavala Shikongo, finalist for the Los Angles Times Book Prize; and Esther Stories, Winner of the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His work has appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, Granta, Best American Stories, and twice received the Pushcart Prize. A 2006 Guggenheim Fellow, he is also the editor of the oral history, Underground America, and co-editor (with Annie Holmes) of Hope Deferred: Narratives of Zimbabwean Lives published in McSweeney’s. He teaches at San Francisco State University.

Susanne Pari

Susanne Pari is the author of The Fortune Catcher, a novel that explores bicultural and bi-religious identity during the aftermath of the 1979 Iranian Revolution, translated into six languages. Her essays and book reviews have appeared in The New York Times Sunday Magazine, The Christian Science Monitor, The Boston Globe, The San Francisco Chronicle, National Public Radio, and Voice of America. She was the program director for the 25 literary salons of Book Group Expo and teaches writing for the Afghan Women’s Writing Project. As a literary host, Susanne has conducted interviews, panel discussions, and conversations with authors such as Amy Tan, Khaled Hosseini, Anna Quindlen, Andre Dubus III, Po Bronson, and many more. She lives in Northern California.

Todd Zuniga

Todd Zuniga is the creator of Literary Death Match, now featured in 39 cities worldwide, the founding editor of Opium Magazine, and the president of Opium for the Arts (a 501©3 nonprofit). He is a Pushcart Prize-nominated writer for his short fiction and an award-winning journalist. His fiction has recently appeared in Stymie and Gopher Illustrated, and online at Lost Magazine and McSweeney’s. Newly based in LA, and couches all over Europe, he longs for a Chicago Cubs World Series and an EU passport.


“Come Together” by The Beatles

Why There Are Words December 8: Last

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on November 14, 2011

It’s our last show of the year so we’ve got just the theme. That’s right: Last. Join us for the stellar line-up, at Sausalito’s Studio 333 at 7 PM, December 8, for books, beer, wine, and great stories. $5 gets you in the door.

Kate Asche

Kate Asche, poet/essayist and creative writing teacher, is a graduate of the UC Davis Creative Writing Program. She was a finalist for the 2011 Audio Contest at The Missouri Review and has poetry forthcoming in Confrontation. She has received two Elliot Gilbert Prizes in Poetry and an Academy of American Poets Award, and is a trained facilitator in the Amherst Writers and Artists (AWA) Method. She coordinates The Tomales Bay Workshops at UC Davis Extension and volunteers regularly for the Sacramento Public Library, the Sacramento Poetry Center, and 916 INK, a local youth literacy organization inspired by 826 Valencia. Follow her and get the scoop on local writing events at her blog Kate’s Miscellany (click on her name.) 

 

David Berkeley

David Berkeley is called “a musical poet” by the San Francisco Chronicle. The singer/songwriter has recently penned a memoir entitled 140 Goats and a Guitar to accompany his fourth album, “Some Kind of Cure.”  The book comprises 13 pieces that tell the stories behind the 13 songs on the album, and the concept is that a reader moves through the prose and music together. When he presents his book live, he performs the corresponding song following each excerpt. He’s been a guest on “This American Life;” has toured with artists including Don Mclean, Dido, Billy Bragg, Ben Folds, Rufus Wainwright, Nickel Creek, and Ray Lamontagne; and maintains a near-constant tour schedule performing concerts all over the country.

Lynn Freed

Lynn Freed’s books include six novels, a collection of stories, and a collection of essays.  Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s, The Atlantic Monthly, Southwest Review, The Georgia Review, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, National Geographic, Narrative Magazine, among others.  She is the recipient of the inaugural Katherine Anne Porter Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a PEN/O. Henry Award, fellowships, grants and support from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Guggenheim Foundation, among others.  Born in South Africa, she now lives in northern California.

Cary Groner

Cary Groner has worked as a journalist for more than two decades. In 2009, he earned his MFA from the University of Arizona, where he began writing short stories and worked on two novels. His stories have won numerous awards and appeared in venues that include Glimmer Train, American Fiction, Mississippi Review, Southern California Review, Tampa Review, and Sycamore Review. His debut novel, Exiles, won the Hackney Literary Award and was published by Spiegel & Grau / Random House this past June. Cary and his wife live in the San Francisco Bay area.

Faith Holsaert

Faith S. Holsaert  was active in the civil rights movement and co-edited the nonfiction book Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC (University of Illinois Press, 2010). She has published fiction since 1979, in Fugue, Washington Review, Phoebe, The Long Story, Antietam Review and others She has appeared online at the kingsenglish.org and mountainechoes.com. She received her MFA in fiction from the Warren Wilson Program for Writers. For many years, she lived in West Virginia where she raised her son and daughter. She lives in Durham, NC with her partner, with whom she shares seven grandchildren. She is working on her third novel.

Nick Krieger

Nick Krieger is the author of the memoir Nina Here Nor There: My Journey Beyond Gender. His writing has earned several travel-writing awards, has been published in multiple travel guides, and has appeared in numerous outlets including The Rumpus, Town & Country, 365Gay, and Original Plumbing. He is passionate about activism through art, creative self-expression, and queering all that he can. He holds an MFA in Writing from the University of San Francisco.


Dean Rader

Dean Rader‘s debut collection of poems, Works & Days, won the 2010 T. S. Eliot Poetry Prize. It is also a finalist for the 2010 Bob Bush Memorial First Book Award and it is the winner of the 2010 Writer’s League of Texas Poetry Prize. His poem “Ocean Beach at Twilight: 14″ was named one of the Best Poems of 2010 by Verse Daily. He is currently curating a new blog called 99 Poems for the 99 Percent. He is a professor at the University of San Francisco, where he won the 2010/2011 Distinguished Research Award.

Ian Tuttle

Ian Tuttle is the author of StretchyHead – Fictional Stories in Real Places. His toy camera photography has been exhibited internationally and he got admitted to business school by quoting Samuel Becket. He believes that you can tell a lot about a person from a short bio, and suspects most of it will be your own projection. But isn’t that the aim of literature? To hang a screen for your projections?


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