Why There Are Words

Why There Are Words May 8, 2014: Contradiction.

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on April 14, 2014

Murkiness, muddiness, confusion, part truth, part fiction. We live between two poles. Join us May 8 when the following readers will read from their works exploring the theme Contradiction. Doors open at 7pm; readings begin at 7:15. $10.  Studio 333 in Sausalito.

Natalie Baszile

Natalie Baszile

Natalie Baszile is the author of the debut novel Queen Sugar. An early version of Queen Sugar won the Hurston Wright College Writer’s Award, was a co-runner up in the Faulkner Pirate’s Alley Novel-in-Progress competition, and excerpts were published in Cairn and ZYZZYVA. She has had residencies at the Ragdale Foundation where she was awarded the Sylvia Clare Brown fellowship, Virginia Center for the Arts, and Hedgebrook. Her non-fiction work has appeared in The Rumpus.net, Mission at Tenth, and in The Best Women’s Travel Writing Volume 9. She is a former fiction editor at The Cortland Review, and is a member of the San Francisco Writers’ Grotto. She has a M.A. in Afro-American Studies from UCLA, and is a graduate of Warren Wilson College’s MFA Program for Writers where she was a Holden Minority Scholar.

Belo Cipriani

Belo Cipriani

Belo Cipriani is the writer-in-residence at Holy Names University and the spokesperson for Earl, the new reading application for the Apple OS. His first book, Blind: A Memoir, is a multiple award-winner and has been listed on various high school and college reading lists. His writing has appeared in Business Insider, Yahoo, Matador, The Good Men Project, and elsewhere. He keynoted the 2011 A.D.A celebration in San Francisco, has guest lectured at Yale University, and is a sought speaker at GLBT, disability, Latino and literary organizations around the country. He is also one of very few blind Capoeira players in the world.

Maria Hummel

Maria Hummel

Maria Hummel is the author of the poetry collection House and Fire, winner of the 2013 APR/Honickman First Book Prize, and two novels: Motherland (Counterpoint, 2014) and Wilderness Run (St. Martin’s, 2003). Her poetry and prose have appeared in Poetry, New England Review, Narrative, The Sun, and The Believer. Her work was also featured in the 2012 Pushcart Prize anthology and the centenary anthology The Open Door: 100 Poems, 100 Years of Poetry Magazine. A former Stegner Fellow in Poetry, Hummel teaches at Stanford University.

David Kukoff

David Kukoff

A native Angeleno and graduate of Columbia University and UCLA Film School, David Kukoff has eleven produced film and television credits to his name. He has published two books on film and television writing, has been the subject of features in Variety, Entertainment Weekly, and The Hollywood Reporter, and has taught writing at Northwestern University. Though he does not currently reside in Laurel Canyon, he has spent the better part of his adult life trying to get himself, as Joni Mitchell put it, “back to the garden.” Children of the Canyon is his first novel.

Alice LaPlante

Alice LaPlante

 Alice LaPlante is an award-winning fiction writer and teacher of writing. Her novel Turn of Mind, was a New York Times bestseller and winner of the Wellcome Prize for Literature and the California Book Award as well as the silver medal for Barnes & Noble’s Discover Great New Writers prize. She was a Stegner Fellow and Jones Lecturer at Stanford University and has taught creative writing at both Stanford and San Francisco State University. Her new book, Circle of Wives, explores the mystery that is at the heart of every marriage through a story about a polygamous doctor.

Jessica Levine

Jessica Levine

Jessica Levine is the author of the debut novel The Geometry of Love (She Writes Press, April 2014). Her stories, essays, poetry, and translations have appeared in many journals, including Green Hills Literary Lantern, North American Review, The Southern Review, and Spoon River Poetry Review. She earned her Ph.D. in English at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Delicate Pursuit: Literary Discretion in Henry James and Edith Wharton (Routledge, 2002) and has translated several books from French and Italian into English.

Porter Shreve

Porter Shreve

Porter Shreve is the author of four novels: The Obituary WriterDrives Like a Dream, When the White House Was Ours, and the recently published The End of the Book. His novels have been named New York Times Notable Book, Chicago Tribune Book of the Year, San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book, among others. He is coeditor of six fiction and essay anthologies and a forthcoming book with Pearson on Creative Writing Craft. He has taught at the University of Michigan, and in the MFA programs at the University of Oregon, the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, Purdue and the University of San Francisco.

Jane Vandenburgh

Jane Vandenburgh

Jane Vandenburgh‘s latest book is The Wrong Dog Dream. She is the award-winning author of two novels, Failure to Zigzag and The Physics of Sunset, as well as the nonfiction works, Architecture of the NovelA Writer’s Handbook, and The Pocket History of Sex in the Twentieth Century, A Memoir. She has taught writing and literature at U. C. Davis, the George Washington University, and, most recently, at Saint Mary’s College in Moraga, Callfornia. A native of Berkeley, she has returned to live with her family in the West, and with Wayne Thiebaud, her new dog.

Why There Are Words takes place every second Thursday of the month, when people come from San Francisco, the North Bay, the East Bay — everywhere — to crowd the house. The brainchild of Peg Alford Pursell, this literary goodness has been going strong into its fifth year.

Why There Are Words: April 10, 2014. Bloomsbury Poets & More.

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on March 14, 2014

Why There Are Words presents poets published in the The Bloomsbury Anthology of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry and special guest novelist Amrit Chima on April 10.  Doors open at 7pm; readings begin at 7:15. $10.  Studio 333 in Sausalito. Join us for this one of a kind event.

Amrit Chima

Amrit Chima

Amrit Chima is the author of the debut novel Darshan  (an IndieReader fiction selection). She’s a former freelance travel writer with featured articles in Global Traveler Magazine and on Untapped Cities with syndication on Flavorwire. Born into a family with a history of inspiring migratory adventures, she has followed suit, traveling to over thirty countries, most notably India and Fiji, both of which are settings in Darshan. She holds an MFA from Emerson College in Boston, and after two years in Budapest, teaching English, she is now back home in the San Francisco Bay Area. She spends her free time working on her second novel, as well as curating a new reading series called anthology.

Susan Cohen

Susan Cohen

Susan Cohen is the author of Throat Singing.  Her new poems appear or are forthcoming in Connotation Press, Hunger Mountain, The Los Angeles Review, Mudfish18, Salamander, Sou’wester,  and Harpur Palate which awarded her the 2013 Milton Kessler Memorial Prize, one of her many honors from literary journals. She lives in Berkeley, taught at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, and was a contributing writer for the Washington Post Magazine before rediscovering poetry while on a Knight Fellowship at Stanford University, then earning an MFA from Pacific University. She’s also co-author of Normal at Any Cost,  a book about height that won awards from the Fund for Investigative Journalism and the National Association of Science Writers.

Lucille Lang Day

Lucille Lang Day

Lucille Lang Day is the author of a memoir, Married at Fourteen: A True Story, which received a 2013 PEN Oakland – Josephine Miles Literary Award and was a finalist for the 2013 Northern California Book Award in Creative Nonfiction. She has also published a children’s book and eight poetry collections and chapbooks, including The Curvature of Blue, The Book of Answers, and Infinities. Her short stories, poems, and essays have appeared in more than 100 literary magazines, such as Atlanta Review, The Cincinnati Review, The Hudson Review, The Paterson Literary Review, and The Threepenny Review. She earned her MFA in creative writing at San Francisco State University and her PhD in science/ mathematics education at UC Berkeley. The founder and director of a small press, Scarlet Tanager Books, she also served for many years as the director of the Hall of Health, an interactive museum in Berkeley. She converted to Judaism in 1974. Twitter: @LucilleLDay.

Colleen McKee

Colleen McKee

Colleen McKee grew up with Russian Jews and Southern Baptists in a log cabin in rural Missouri (and lived to tell the tale). Colleen is the author of four collections of poetry, fiction, and memoir–including her new book, called Nine Kinds of Wrong. She now lives in Oakland and teaches at the Academy of Art in San Francisco.

Lee Slonimsky

Lee Slonimsky

Lee Slonimsky is the author of four books of poems, the most recent  Logician of the Wind (2012) from Orchises Press in Virginia.  A fifth, Wandering Electron, is forthcoming from Spuyten Duyvil Press in New York City in the fall of 2014.  Along with Santa Rosa CA poet and radio host Katherine Hastings, he is the co-author of a chapbook, Slow Shadow/White Delirium, published in the fall of 2013 by Word Temple Press.  Lee’s individual poems and essays have appeared in Best of Asheville Poetry Review, The Carolina Quarterly, The Classical Outlook, Measure, New Ohio Review, The New York Times, North Dakota Quarterly, Poetry Daily, 32 Poems, Valparaiso Poetry Review, and other journals.  And he is co-author, along with his wife, Hammett Prize winning novelist Carol Goodman, of Lee Carroll’s Black Swan Rising urban fantasy trilogy.

Melissa Stein

Melissa Stein

Melissa Stein is the author of the poetry collection Rough Honey, winner of the APR/Honickman First Book Prize. Her work has appeared in Southern Review, Harvard Review, New England Review, Best New Poets 2009, and many other journals and anthologies. She is a freelance editor and writer in San Francisco.

Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet

Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet

Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet’s The Greenhouse is forthcoming from Bull City Press in 2014. Her first book of poems, Tulips, Water, Ash was selected for the Morse Poetry Prize and published by University Press of New England. Her poems have been awarded a Javits fellowship and a Phelan Award, and have appeared in journals including Cream City Review, At Length, Quarterly West, Blackbird, The Iowa Review, 32 Poems, and Third Coast and in the anthologies Best New Poets and The Bloomsbury Anthology of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry. She writes, edits, and teaches in Oakland, California.

Why There Are Words takes place every second Thursday of the month, when people come from San Francisco, the North Bay, the East Bay — everywhere — to crowd the house. The brainchild of Peg Alford Pursell, this literary goodness has been going strong into its now fifth year.

Why There Are Words: March 13, 2014. Name the Theme.

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on February 15, 2014

Why There Are Words wants you to name the theme. Join us March 13th when the following readers will read from their works. Listen closely and decide the evening’s theme. Doors open at 7pm; readings begin at 7:15. $10.  Studio 333 in Sausalito.

Kirsten Chen

Kirstin Chen

Kirstin Chen is the author of Soy Sauce for Beginners. A former Steinbeck Fellow in Creative Writing, she holds an MFA from Emerson College and a BA from Stanford University. She has received awards from the Sewanee and Napa Valley Writers Conferences. Her short stories have appeared in Zyzzyva, Hobart, Pank, and others, and have been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and the Best New American Voices anthology. She was born and raised in Singapore and currently lives in San Francisco, where she’s at work on her second novel, set on a tiny island off the coast of southern China in 1958.

Adrianne Harun

Adrianne Harun

Adrianne Haruns prize-winning short fiction, essays, and book reviews have been published in numerous magazines and journals, including Story, the Chicago Tribune, Narrative MagazineOntario Review, The Sun, Willow Springs, and Colorado Review. Her first novel is A Man Came Out of the Door in the Mountain (Penguin Books, February 2014). Her short story collection, The King of Limbo (Houghton Mifflin), was a Sewanee Writing Series selection and a Washington State Book Award finalist. Stories from an upcoming collection have been noted as “Distinguished Stories” in both Best American Mystery Stories (2003) and Best American Short Stories (2009). She is also a member of the core faculty of the Rainier Writing Workshops, an MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University, as well as a faculty member at the Sewanee School of Letters at the University of the South. She lives with her husband in Port Townsend, Washington.

David Haynes

David Haynes

David Haynes is the author of seven novels for adults and five books for younger readers. He is an Associate Professor of English at Southern Methodist University where he directs the creative writing program. He teaches regularly in the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers and has taught in the MFA Programs at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, Hamline University, and at the Writer’s Center in Bethesda, MD, and at the Writers’ Garret in Dallas. His teaching interests include gender, class, race, and generational differences – all themes that he explores in great depth in A Star in the Face of the Sky, his most recent novel. He received a fellowship from the Minnesota State Arts Board, and several of his short stories have been recorded for the National Public Radio series “Selected Shorts.” In 1996 Granta magazine named him as one of the best young American novelists. For fifteen years David served as a teacher in urban schools, mostly teaching middle grades in Saint Paul, Minnesota, and was involved in the work of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, coordinating efforts of the nation’s finest educators to develop standards in the fields of social studies, vocational education, early childhood education and for teachers of students whose first language is not English. He is currently a director of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) and is the Founder and Project Director for Kimbilio.

Maria Hummel

Maria Hummel

Maria Hummel is the author of the poetry collection House and Fire, winner of the 2013 APR/Honickman First Book Prize, and two novels: Motherland (Counterpoint, 2014) and Wilderness Run (St. Martin’s, 2003). Her poetry and prose have appeared in Poetry, New England Review, Narrative, The Sun, and The Believer. Her work was also featured in the 2012 Pushcart Prize anthology and the centenary anthology The Open Door: 100 Poems, 100 Years of Poetry Magazine. A former Stegner Fellow in Poetry, Hummel teaches at Stanford University.

Michael Nava

Michael Nava

Michael Nava, a third-generation Californian of Mexican descent, is the author of an acclaimed series of crime novels featuring Henry Rios, a gay Latino criminal defense lawyer. Published between 1986 and 2000, each new novel was greeted with greater critical acclaim until, about the last novel, Rag and Bone, the New York Times reviewer wrote simply:  “Nava is one of our best.” The series won six Lambda Literary Awards. In 2001, Nava received the Bill Whitehead Award for Lifetime Achievement in gay and lesbian literature. For the last 15 years, Nava has been working on a series of novels loosely inspired by the life and times of silent film star Ramon Novarro, a Mexican national who fled his homeland as a teenager during the Mexican Revolution and became one of the great stars of the silent era, known most memorably for his role in the original Ben Hur. The City of Palaces is the first novel in the series and is set in Mexico City just before and at the beginning of the Revolution of 1910.

Ethel Rohan

Ethel Rohan

Ethel Rohan is the author of two story collections, Goodnight Nobody and Cut Through the Bone, the latter named a 2010 Notable Story Collection by The Story Prize. She is also the author of the chapbook, Hard to Say. Her e-book, a short memoir titled His Heartbeat in my Hand, is forthcoming from Shebooks in 2014. Winner of Ireland’s 2013 Bryan MacMahon Short Story Award, her work has or will appear in The New York TimesWorld Literature TodayPEN America, Tin House Online, BREVITY Magazine, and The Rumpus, among many others. A former book reviewer for New York Journal of Books, she received her MFA in fiction from Mills College. Raised in Dublin, Ireland, she lives in San Francisco where she is a member of The Writers’ Grotto and PEN USA.

Why There Are Words takes place every second Thursday of the month, when people come from San Francisco, the North Bay, the East Bay — everywhere — to crowd the house. The brainchild of Peg Alford Pursell, this literary goodness has been going strong into its fifth year.

Why There Are Words & ZYZZYVA February 13

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on January 12, 2014

Why There Are Words teams up with ZYZZYVA – the last word: West Coast writers and artists as the journal marks its 100th issue this coming spring. Join us Feb. 13 when readers recently published in the journal, along with special guest Marian Szczepanski, will read from their latest works. Doors open at 7pm. $10.  Studio 333 in Sausalito.

First published in 1985, and marking its 100th issue in Spring 2014, ZYZZYVA is an acclaimed San Francisco literary institution. Counting among its contributors the likes of Po Bronson, Chitra Divakaruni, Haruki Murakami, Jim Gavin, F.X. Toole, Sherman Alexie, Molly Giles, Kay Ryan, Adrienne Rich, Raymond Carver, and many others, work appearing in ZYZZYVA has received the Pushcart Prize and the O. Henry Award, and has been noted or included in The Best American Short Stories, The Best American Essays, and The Best American Nonrequired Reading series. Editor Laura Cogan and Managing Editor Oscar Villalon have been editing the journal since 2011.

Heather_Altfeld

Heather Altfeld

Heather Altfeld is a lecturer in the English department at California State University, Chico. Her recently completed book of poetry is The Disappearing Theatre. She has published poetry in Pleiades, ZYZZYVA, Superstition Review, The Tule Review, The Squaw Valley Review, Antique Children, Clackamas, and The New Guard.

Troy Jollimore

Troy Jollimore

Troy Jollimore is Professor of Philosophy at California State University, Chico. He is the author of On Loyalty (Routledge), Love’s Vision (Princeton University Press), and two collections of poems: At Lake Scugog (Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets) and Tom Thomson in Purgatory (Margie/Intuit House), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for poetry.

Earle McCartney

Earle McCartney

Earle McCartney is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he was awarded the Glenn Schaeffer Fellowship. He was published recently in ZYZZYVA and The Common, and holds a BA in mathematics from Williams College. He is currently at work on a novel and a collection of long stories. Earle McCartney is a graduate of the Iowa Writers Workshop and was awarded the Joseph Henry Jackson Award in 2013. His work has appeared in ZYZZYVA and the Common, and he’s currently at work on a novel and a collection of long stories.

Lori Ostlund

Lori Ostlund

Lori Ostlund‘s story collection The Bigness of the World (University of Georgia Press) was awarded the California Book Award, the Edmund White Debut Fiction Award, and the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction. The recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, she lives in San Francisco.

Dean Rader

Dean Rader

Dean Rader’s poetry collection Works & Days (Truman State University Press) was the winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize. His most recent book is Landscape/Portrait/Figure/Form (Omnidawn). He is a professor of English at the University of San Francisco. http://www.deanrader.com

Marian-Szczepanski

Marian Szczepanski

Marian Szczepanski holds an MFA from Warren Wilson College and has won awards for short fiction and magazine feature writing. The granddaughter of immigrant coal miners, she grew up in southwestern Pennsylvania and lived as a young child in the Jamison Coal Company house where her mother and aunts were raised. Playing St. Barbara is her first novel. She lives in Houston, Texas.

Why There Are Words takes place every second Thursday of the month, when people come from San Francisco, the North Bay, the East Bay — everywhere — to crowd the house. The brainchild of Peg Alford Pursell, this literary goodness has been going strong for four years.

Why There Are Words January 9: Your Selected Readers

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on December 11, 2013

PAHR-TEE! For four years, WTAW has been doing what you love while we have been doing what we love: gathering writers extraordinaire to read their works to listeners extraordinaire. Join us on January 9, 2014, to celebrate the beginning of our quinquennium and to hear the top six writers you selected from the last four extraordinary years to read at Studio 333 in Sausalito. Doors will open at 7 pm and readings start at 7:15. Bring extra cash for books and booze.

Tom Barbash

Tom Barbash

Tom Barbash is the author of a novel, The Last Good Chance, the nonfiction book, On Top of the World: Cantor Fitzgerald, Howard Lutnick, and 9/11, and most recently the acclaimed collection of stories, Stay Up with Me. His work has appeared in McSweeney’s, The Believer, and The New York Times. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow, he currently teaches at California College of the Arts.

Lynn Freed

Lynn Freed

Lynn Freed’s books include six novels, a collection of stories, and a collection of essays.  Her work has appeared in Harper’s, The New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, National Geographic, Narrative Magazine, Southwest Review, The Georgia Review, among others. She is the recipient of the inaugural Katherine Anne Porter Award in Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a PEN/O. Henry Award, fellowships, grants and support from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Guggenheim Foundation, among others. Born in South Africa, she now lives in northern California.

Molly Giles

Molly Giles

Molly Giles has published three award winning collections of stories, Rough Translations, which won The Flannery O’Connor Prize, the Boston Globe Award, and was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize; Creekwalk, which won the Small Press Award for Short Fiction and the California Commonwealth Silver Medal for Fiction; and Bothered, which won a flash fiction prize from Split Oak Press. Her novel, Iron Shoes, has won no prizes at all. She has an ebook of stories coming out from shebooks titled Three For the Road, and new stories in The Fairy Tale Review and Black Heart. Her latest story collection, All the Wrong Places, just won the Spokane Prize for Fiction and will be forthcoming from Willow Springs Press later this year. She taught fiction writing for many years at San Francisco State University and the University of Arkansas, has edited many published writers, and mentors through the Path to Publishing program at Book Passage. She is currently working on another non-prize winning novel.

Glen David Gold

Glen David Gold

Glen David Gold is the author of the novels Carter Beats the Devil and Sunnyside.  His short stories and essays have appeared in McSweeney’s, Playboy, The New York Times Sunday Magazine, the LA Review of Books, Tin House, and Black Clock. He has written comic books for DC and Dark Horse. Lately he’s been writing scripts for The Thrilling Adventure Hour and Welcome to Night Vale, and the first chapter of his memoir is forthcoming in Zyzzyva. In 2014, the Circle Theater in Hollywood will launch his multi-part adaptation of Otto Friedrich’s City of Nets.

Daniel Handler

Daniel Handler

Daniel Handler is the author of the novels The Basic Eight, Watch Your Mouth, Adverbs, and Why We Broke Up, recently awarded a Michael L. Printz Honor. As Lemony Snicket, he is the author of far too many books for children, including the internationally bestselling A Series Of Unfortunate Events and his new series, All The Wrong Questions. He is adjunct accordionist for the pop group The Magnetic Fields.

Melissa Pritchard

Melissa Pritchard

Melissa Pritchard is the author of four short story collections: The Odditorium, Disappearing Ingenue, The Instinct for Bliss, and Spirit Seizures; and four novels: Phoenix, Selene of the Spirits, Late Bloomer, and the brand new Palmerino. She is also the author of Devotedly, Virginia, a biography of Arizona philanthropist Virginia Galvin Piper. Her short stories are frequently anthologized and cited in Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards, The Pushcart Prize, Best American Short Stories, the Prentice Hall Anthology of Women’s Literature, and numerous other anthologies and textbooks. Her fiction has appeared in over sixty renowned literary journals, including The Paris Review, A Public Space, Agni, The Southern Review, Gulf Coast, Gettysburg Review and others. A recipient of numerous awards, including fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Howard Foundation at Brown University, the Bogliasco Foundation, and the Ledig-Rowohlt Foundation, she teaches at Arizona State University.

Why There Are Words takes place every second Thursday of the month, when people come from San Francisco, the North Bay, the East Bay — everywhere — to crowd the house. The brainchild of Peg Alford Pursell, this literary goodness has been going strong for four years. Interns Hal King and Kim Marcellino make everyone happy.

Why There Are Words November 14: Purpose

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on October 18, 2013

Join us for our last event of the year on November 14 when the following readers will read their works on the theme of “Purpose.” We’ll be in Studio 333 in Sausalito, and doors will open at 7 pm. Readings start at 7:15. Bring extra cash for books and booze.

AND help us choose our readers for our special anniversary event on January 9, 2014, when we celebrate 4 years of fabulousness. Go to this page for all the details. We’ll take your selections up until November 15.

Harriet Chessman

Harriet Chessman

Harriet Scott Chessman is a fiction writer and poet living in Palo Alto. Her new novel The Beauty of Ordinary Things is forthcoming this November from Atelier26. Her earlier novels include Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper (#1 on BookSense), Someone Not Really Her Mother (a San Francisco Chronicle Best Book and a Good Morning America book club choice), and her first novel, Ohio Angels.

Jasmin Darznik

Jasmin Darznik

Jasmin Darznik is the author of The Good Daughter: A Memoir of My Mother’s Hidden Life (Grand Central 2011).  A New York Times bestseller, the memoir has been published in twelve countries, was shortlisted for the 2012 Saroyan International Prize, and chosen as a finalist for the 2011 Reader’s Choice Award from the Library of Virginia. Jasmin was born in Tehran, Iran, and received her PhD from Princeton University. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and other publications.

Khanisa Foster

Khanisha Foster

Khanisha Foster is a mixed race actress, writer, teaching artist, the Associate Artistic Director of 2nd Story, and an ensemble member of Teatro Vista. She was chosen for the Theatre Communication Groups’ Young Leaders of Color 2009 and an artist exchange with the Citizen’s Theatre of Scotland in Glasgow. She is a Sarah Siddon’s Society Scholarship recipient and a two time finalist for the PEN Emerging Voices Fellowship. Her teaching artist work has been honored by the White House. Her writing has been published with CellStories and podcast through 2nd Story, and will be published in the November 2013 release of the anthology Briefly Knocked Unconscious By a Low Flying Duck. She has performed with Teatro Vista, the Goodman Theatre, Steep Theater, and Collaboraction, among others. She can be seen in the film “Chicago Boricua,” official selection the Tribeca Film Festival, the Chicago Latino Film Festivals, and closing night selection for the New York Latino International Film Festival. Currently Khanisha is working on her memoir “Heroin(e)” and several screenplays.

Anne Germanacos

Anne Germanacos

Anne Germanacos lives with her husband in San Francisco and on Crete, where together they ran Ithaka Cultural Studies on the islands of Kalymnos and Crete. She is President of the Germanacos Foundation, supporting educational programs that utilize a broad range of perspectives to foster a critical scrutiny of society. Her work has appeared in over a hundred literary journals and anthologies.Her collection of short stories, In the Time of the Girls, was published by BOA Editions. Her novel, Tribute, will be published by Rescue Press in 2014.

Daniel Hoyt

Daniel Hoyt

Daniel A. Hoyt‘s first short story collection, Then We Saw the Flames, won the Juniper Prize for Fiction and was published by UMass Press. Dan is an assistant professor at Kansas State University, where he currently directs the creative writing program. Dan’s fiction is forthcoming or has appeared in The Kenyon Review, The Missouri Review, Gettysburg Review, and other literary magazines, and he’s at work on a new story collection, about 21st century fame, and a nonfiction book about college football.

hh_color_cropped bwTung-Hui Hu is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently Greenhouses, Lighthouses (Copper Canyon, 2013). His poems have appeared in places such as Boston Review, The New Republic, Ploughshares, Gastronomica, and Martha Stewart Living Radio, and he has been a resident at Yaddo and MacDowell Colony. Formerly a computer scientist and political consultant, he now teaches at the University of Michigan, where he is an assistant professor of English.

Valerie Miner

Valerie Miner

Valerie Miner is the award-winning author of fourteen books, the latest of which was her 2013 novel, Traveling with Spirits. Other novels include After Eden, Range of Light, A Walking Fire, Winter’s Edge, Blood Sisters, All Good Women, Movement: A Novel in Stories, and Murder in the English Department. Her short fiction books include Abundant Light, The Night Singers, and Trespassing. Her collection of essays is Rumors from the Cauldron: Selected Essays, Reviews and Reportage. In 2002, The Low Road: A Scottish Family Memoir was a finalist for the PEN USA Creative Non-Fiction Award. Abundant Light was a 2005 fiction finalist for the Lambda Literary Awards. Her work has appeared in The Georgia Review, Triquarterly, Salmagundi, New Letters, Ploughshares, The Village Voice, Prairie Schooner, The Gettysburg Review, The T.L.S., The Women’s Review of Books, The Nation, and other journals.  Her stories and essays are published in more than sixty anthologies. A number of her pieces have been dramatized on BBC Radio 4. Her work has been translated into several languages, and she has won fellowships and awards from The Rockefeller Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, The NEA, The Jerome Foundation, The Heinz Foundation, The Australia Council Literary Arts Board and numerous other sources.  She has received Fulbright Fellowships to Tunisia, India, and Indonesia. Winner of a Distinguished Teaching Award, she has taught for over twenty-five years and is now a professor and artist in residence at Stanford University.

Toni Piccinini

Toni Piccinini

Toni Piccinini’s writing path has meandered from the scholarly examination (or scary horror story) of antibiotic use in The Journal of Clinical Pathology to her personal essay “House Affair,”  a Narrative magazine Story of the Week. Along the way she opened a San Francisco “Top 100” restaurant and published recipes and cookbook reviews in local and national newspapers, magazines, and cookbooks. The Goodbye Year (Seal Press 2013) is her first book.

Susanna Solomon

Susanna Solomon

When Mildred Rhinehart, 82, shoved her way into Susanna Solomon’s heart and moved into her mind she realized it was time for her to sit down and listen. Mildred’s long-suffering husband Fred was next. Awkward Alice, Mildred’s granddaughter, came for tea and was soon followed by new cop on the block, Linda. Thomas, a sixteen-year-old kid in love with driving and girls, came too. With these characters Susanna writes stories inspired by Sheriff’s Calls entries in the Point Reyes Light. Her stories have been published in the Point Reyes Light, Harlot’s Sauce Radio, the Mill Valley Literary Review, and more. Her short story collection Point Reyes Sheriff’s Calls is coming out this November from HD Media Press.

Why There Are Words takes place every second Thursday of the month, when people come from San Francisco, the North Bay, the East Bay — everywhere — to crowd the house. The brainchild of Peg Alford Pursell, this literary goodness has been going strong for three years.

Why There Are Words Hearts Litquake: October 17, 2013

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on September 15, 2013

In October 2013, for the first time ever, we move our date to the third Thursday — October 17 — just so we can bring our fabulousness to the ultra-fabulousness that is Litquake. Come endure the fabulousness if you dare. Studio 333 in Sausalito, October 17, 2013. Curated by Peg Alford Pursell. Doors open at 7 pm; readings begin at 7:15. $10. Bring extra cash for books and booze.

Sally Ball

Sally Ball

Sally Ball is the author of Wreck Me and Annus Mirabilis. Her poems have appeared online at Narrative and Slate; in print in the American Poetry Review, Forklift Ohio, Harvard Review, Ploughshares, Yale Review; and other magazines, as well as in The Best American Poetry anthology. An assistant professor of English at Arizona State University, she is also associate director of Four Way Books. She has received fellowships from the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, the James Merrill House, and the Ucross Foundation. She has also taught at the Frost Place Conference on Poetry.

Vikram Chandra

Vikram Chandra

Vikram Chandra’s first novel, Red Earth and Pouring Rain, published in 1995, won the Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best First Book and the David Higham Prize for Fiction. His collection of short stories, Love and Longing in Bombay, was published in 1997. Love and Longing in Bombay won the Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best Book (Eurasia region) and was short-listed for the Guardian Fiction Prize. The book was included in “Notable Books of 1997” by the New York Times Book Review, in “Best Books of the Year” by the Independent (London), in “Best Books of the Year” by the Guardian (London), and in “The Ten Best Books of 1997” by Outlook magazine (New Delhi). Sacred Games, a novel, was published in 2006. The book was awarded the Hutch Crossword Prize for Fiction in English (the “Indian Booker”) for 2006; it was also the winner of a 2007 Salon Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction. Sacred Games was included in numerous annual lists including “Books of the Year,” The Independent (UK); “Books of the Year,” Financial Times (UK); “10 Best Asian Books of 2006,” Time (Asia Edition); “Best Fiction of 2006,” Guardian (USA); “The Fiction List for 2006,” Bloomberg.com (USA). He has published in the Paris Review and the New Yorker. His work has been translated into nineteen languages. He currently divides his time between Bombay and Berkeley, California, where he teaches creative writing at the University of California.

Russell Dillon

Russell Dillon

Russell Dillion was born in New York in the mid-seventies and just hasn’t been able to get over it. After attending a number of schools, he received degrees from Emerson and Bennington College, later ending up in San Francisco for nearly a decade. Now, back in New York he only eats burritos facing west and continues to co-edit the magazine Big Bell. Poems have appeared, or are forthcoming, in Lumberyard, H_NGM_N, Forklift Ohio, 5 am, Parthenon West, Mi Poesia, and Bright Pink Mosquito, among others.  A chapbook, Secret Damage, was released from Forklift Ink in 2009, and his full-length collection, Eternal Patrol, appeared from Forklift Books in the summer of 2013.

Rae Gouirand

Rae Gouirand

Rae Gouirand’s first collection of poetry, Open Winter, was selected by Elaine Equi for the 2011 Bellday Prize, and won a 2012 Independent Publisher Book Award and the 2012 Eric Hoffer Book Award. Her new work has appeared most recently in American Poetry Review, PANK, Handsome, VOLT, The BrooklynerGertrude, and The Gay & Lesbian Review Worldwide. An adjunct lecturer in the Department of English at UC-Davis, she leads numerous private and grant-funded workshops in poetry and prose throughout the Central Valley and the cross-genre online workshop SCRIBE LAB.

Matt Hart

Matt Hart

Matt Hart is the author of five books of poetry, most recently Sermons and Lectures Both Blank and Relentless (Typecast Publishing, 2012) and Debacle Debacle (H_NGM_N Books, 2013), as well as several chapbooks. Additionally, his poems, reviews, and essays have appeared in numerous print and online journals, including Big BellCincinnati ReviewColdfrontColumbia Poetry Review, H_NGM_N, Harvard ReviewjubilatLungfull!, Post Road, and r.kv.r.y among others. His awards include a Pushcart Prize and a 2013 individual artist grant from The Shifting Foundation, and fellowships from both the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and the Warren Wilson College MFA Program for Writers. A co-founder and the editor-in-chief of Forklift, Ohio: A Journal of Poetry, Cooking & Light Industrial Safety, he lives in Cincinnati where he teaches at the Art Academy of Cincinnati and plays in the band TRAVEL.

Kate Milliken

Kate Milliken

Kate Milliken’s story collection, If I’d Known You Were Coming, won the 2013 John Simmons Iowa Short Fiction Award, judged by Julie Orringer. Her stories previously appeared in Zyzzyva, Meridian, New Orleans Review, Fiction, and the Santa Monica Review, among others, as well as earned several pushcart nominations and fellowships from the Vermont Studio Center and the Tin House Summer Writing Workshops. Before completing her MFA at the Bennington College Writing Seminars, Kate wrote for television and commercial advertising. She now teaches both privately and on behalf of the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program as well as at Book Passage in Corte Madera. Born in New Haven, Connecticut, briefly raised on a farm in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, and eventually bouncing between her mother’s house in Los Angeles and her father’s home in Chicago, Kate, now settled with her husband and two kids in the suburban wilds of Mill Valley, California.

Melissa Pritchard

Melissa Pritchard

Melissa Pritchard is the nationally renowned author of four short story collections: The Odditorium, Disappearing Ingenue, The Instinct for Bliss, and Spirit Seizures; and four novels: Phoenix, Selene of the Spirits, Late Bloomer, and Palmerino, forthcoming in 2014. She is also the author of Devotedly, Virginia, a biography of Arizona philanthropist Virginia Galvin Piper. Spirit Seizures, a New York Times Notable Book, received both the Flannery O’Connor and Carl Sandburg Awards. The Instinct for Bliss, also a New York Times Notable Book, received the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize, and Disappearing Ingenue, a Doubleday “Fiction for the Rest of Us,” selection, was chosen to appear on National Public Radio’s 2002 Summer Reading List. The Odditorium, selected as an Oprah Winfrey “Book of the Week,” received rave reviews nationally and was also a Library Journal and San Francisco Chronicle Book of the Year, 2012. Her short stories are frequently anthologized and cited in Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards, The Pushcart Prize, Best of the West, Best American Short Stories, the Prentice Hall Anthology of Women’s Literature and numerous other anthologies and college textbooks. Her fiction has appeared in over sixty renowned literary journals, including The Paris Review, A Public Space, Agni, Ecotone, The Southern Review, Gulf Coast, Conjunctions, Gettysburg Review and Image: Art, Faith, Mystery. Her book reviews, essays, and journalism pieces have appeared in The Wilson Quarterly, O, the Oprah Winfrey Magazine, the Nation, the New York Times Book Review and Chicago Tribune Books. Her essay, “A Solemn Pleasure,” published in Conjunctions by guest editor, David Shields, has been reprinted in The Inevitable: Contemporary Writers Confront Death, W.W. Norton, 2011. A recipient of numerous awards, including fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Howard Foundation at Brown University, the Illinois Arts Council, Writer’s Voice YMCA, Scotland’s Hawthornden Castle, the Bogliasco Foundation (Liguria, Italy), and the Ledig-Rowohlt Foundation (Chateau de Lavigny, Switzerland), Melissa teaches at Arizona State University and has served as judge for The Flannery O’Connor Award and the PEN/Faulkner Award.

Jane Smiley

Jane Smiley

Jane Smiley is the author of thirteen works of fiction, including The Age of Grief, The Greenlanders, Ordinary Love and Good Will, A Thousand Acres, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1992, Moo, Horse Heaven, which was short-listed for the Orange Prize in 2002, The All True Travels and Adventures of Lidie Newton, which won the 1999 Spur Award for Best Novel of the West. and Good Earth, as well as many essays for such magazines as Vogue, The New Yorker, Elle, Outside, Harper’s The American Prospect, Practical Horseman, The New York Times Magazine and The New York Times travel section, Victoria, Mirabella, Allure, The Nation, The Guardian Sport Monthly, Real Simple, Playboy, and others. She has written on politics, farming, horse training, child-rearing, literature, impulse buying, getting dressed, Barbie, marriage, and many other topics. She is also the author of the four books of nonfiction, including A Year at the Races, Thirteen Ways of Looking at the Novel, and from Penguin Lives Series, a biography of Charles Dickens. She was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2001. In December 2006, Jane received the Pen USA Lifetime Achievement Award for Literature. She lives in Northern California, as do several of her horses.

Why There Are Words takes place every second Thursday of the month, when people come from San Francisco, the North Bay, the East Bay — everywhere — to crowd the house. The brainchild of Peg Alford Pursell, this literary goodness has been going strong for three years. Join us again in November on our regularly scheduled night!

Why There Are Words Reading September 12: Mistake

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on August 12, 2013

 

To err is human… In fact, blundering may be what we humans do best. Our common thread: one lovely slip-up after another. Don’t make the MISTAKE of missing what our readers have to share about this topic. (You knew we were going to say that, didn’t you?) Studio 333 in Sausalito, September 12, 2013. Curated by Peg Alford Pursell. Doors open at 7 pm; readings begin at 7:15. $10. Bring extra cash for books and booze.

Thaisa Frank

Thaisa Frank

Thaisa Frank’s sixth book, Enchantment, includes two semi-autobiographical novellas and thirty-three stories. Heidegger’s Glasses (2010), about the mythical haven of an underground mine during WWII, sold to ten foreign countries. She is also the author of Sleeping in Velvet and A Brief History of Camouflage. Her one non-fiction book, Finding Your Writer’s Voice, has been translated into Portuguese and Spanish and is used in MFA programs.

Cristina Garcia

Cristina Garcia

Cristina García is the author of, most recently, the novel King of Cuba. She is the author of six other novels, including: Dreaming in Cuban, The Agüero Sisters, Monkey Hunting, A Handbook to Luck, and The Lady Matador’s Hotel. She has edited two anthologies, Cubanísimo: The Vintage Book of Contemporary Cuban Literature and Bordering Fires: The Vintage Book of Contemporary Mexican and Chicano/a Literature. Two works for young readers, The Dog Who Loved the Moon, and I Wanna Be Your Shoebox were published in 2008. A collection of poetry, The Lesser Tragedy of Death, was published in 2010. Her recent young adult novel, Dreams of Significant Girls, is set in a Swiss boarding school in the 1970s. Her work has been nominated for a National Book Award and translated into fourteen languages. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Hodder Fellowship at Princeton University, and an NEA grant, among others. Recently, she was a Visiting Professor at the Michener Center for Writers at the University of Texas-Austin as well as the University of Miami. Currently, she is University Chair in Creative Writing at Texas State University-San Marcos.

Helen Hooper

Helen Hooper

Helen Hooper’s fiction appears in the journals The Common, Bellevue Literary Review, Hopkins Review, New South, and the anthology Gravity Dancer: Fiction from Washington Area Women. A 2011-2013 Stegner fellow, she is a former Kenyon Review workshop Peter Taylor fellow and a recipient of residencies at Ucross, Ragdale and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. She worked in environmental policy in Washington, D.C. for twenty-five years, most recently as a lobbyist for The Nature Conservancy. She holds an MFA from Warren Wilson. She is currently working on a novel set in northern Alabama.

 

Becca Lawton

Becca Lawton

Rebecca Lawton is an author and naturalist whose literary honors include the Ellen Meloy Fund Award for Desert Writers, residencies at Hedgebrook and The Island Institute, and three Pushcart Prize nominations – in fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. Her collection of essays about whitewater guiding, Reading Water: Lessons from the River, was a San Francisco Chronicle Bay Area Bestseller in 2008 and ForeWord Nature Book of the Year finalist in 2003. She is co-author of four additional books on creativity and the outdoors, including the forthcoming Sacrament: Homage to a River (Heyday, 2013). Her debut novel, Junction, Utah, explores the impact of oil exploration on American wilderness and rural life (van Haitsma Literary, 2013). She was one of the first women guides on Western rivers, spending ten of fourteen seasons in Grand Canyon. Currently she serves on the Board of Directors for Friends of the River.

Keenan Norris

Keenan Norris

Keenan Norris’ novel Brother and the Dancer is the winner of the 2012 James D. Houston Award and will be published by Heyday Books in November 2013. He holds an MFA from Mills College and a PhD from the University of California, Riverside. His research interests include urban literature and the publishing industry. He teaches English, African-American Literature and promotes the AFFIRM program at Evergreen Valley College in San Jose, California. His work, both fiction and non-fiction, has appeared in the Santa Monica, Green Mountains, and Evansville Reviews, Connotation Press, Inlandia: A Literary Journey Through California’s Inland Empire, and BOOM: A Journal of California. He is also the editor of Scarecrow Press’s upcoming collection of critical essays Street Lit: Popularity, Controversy & Analysis and lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Elizabeth Scarboro

Elizabeth Scarboro

Elizabeth Scarboro is the author of the memoir My Foreign Cities, an unlikely love story set on the frontiers of modern medicine, which was listed by Publisher’s Weekly as one of the Top Ten Memoirs for Spring.  She is also the author of two novels for children. Her writing has appeared most recently in the New York Times and the Bellevue Literary Review. She lives with her family in Berkeley, California.

Ransom Stephens

Ransom Stephens

Ransom Stephens is a science writer, physicist, and novelist. He’s written over 300 articles on subjects ranging from quantum physics to parenting teenagers, produces events for Litquake, and co-produces two literary series. His first novel, The God Patent, was “the first debut novel to emerge from the new paradigm of online publishing,” according to the San Francisco Chronicle. His second novel, The Sensory Deception, is a mind-blowing, globe-trotting ride that will take readers from cut-throat Silicon Valley boardrooms to the pirate ships off the Somali coast to the devastated rain forests of the Amazon all to ask the question: what is a human life worth compared to that of an entire planet?

Monica Wesolowska

Monica Wesolowska

Monica Wesolowska is the author of the memoir, Holding Silvan: A Brief Life (Hawthorne Books, March 2013 with an intro by Erica Jong), which explores the love and ethics behind forgoing medical intervention for her newborn son. She has published her work in many literary journals and anthologies including Best New American Voices 2000; My Little Red Book; Beach: Stories from the Sand and Sea; The Carolina Quarterly; Pisgah Review; Quarter After Eight; and online at Literary Mama. A former fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, she has taught fiction writing at UC Berkeley Extension for over a decade. She lives in her hometown of Berkeley with her family.

Why There Are Words takes place every second Thursday of the month, when people come from San Francisco, the North Bay, the East Bay — everywhere — to crowd the house. The brainchild of Peg Alford Pursell, this literary goodness has been going strong for three years.

 

 

Why There Are Words Reading August 8: Magic

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on July 15, 2013

Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series always provides a magical night with its award-winning writers. Join us August 8, 2013 at Studio 333 to find out what the following fine writers have up their sleeves when they read their works on the theme “Magic.” Doors open at 7 pm & readings begin at 7:15. $10. Bring extra cash for books and booze.

Nan Cuba

Nan Cuba

Nan Cuba is the author of Body and Bread (Engine Books), one of “Ten Titles to Pick Up Now” in O, Oprah’s Magazine and a “Summer Books” choice from Huffington Post.  She also co-edited Art at our Doorstep: San Antonio Writers and Artists (Trinity University Press) and published other work in such places as Quarterly West, Columbia, Antioch Review, Harvard Review, storySouth, and Connotation Press. As an investigative journalist, she reported on the causes of extraordinary violence in LIFE, Third Coast, and D Magazine. She is founder and executive director emeritus of the nonprofit literary center, Gemini Ink, and an associate professor of English at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio.

Julie Debondt Barker

Julie DeBondt Barker

Julie DeBondt-Barker is the author of The Mourning After. Since the book’s release, she was invited to become an Ambassador for Beyondblue (an independent, not-for-profit organization), for which she is speaking on the national circuit. She assisted Bishop Gene Robinson’s tour of Australia, “Straight Talk About Gay Marriage.” Born and raised in Oregon she has called Melbourne, Australia, home for the past 28 years.

Katie Hafner

Katie Hafner

Katie Hafner is the author of most recently the memoir Mother Daughter Me. She was on staff at The New York Times for ten years, where she remains a frequent contributor, writing on healthcare and technology. She has also worked at Newsweek and BusinessWeek, and has written for The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Wired, The New Republic, The Huffington Post, and O, The Oprah Magazine. She is the author of five previous works of nonfiction covering a diverse range of topics, including the origins of the Internet, computer hackers, German reunification, and the pianist Glenn Gould.

Alan Kaufman

Alan Kaufman

Alan Kaufman is a Bronx-born son of a Holocaust survivor and an Israeli army veteran.  One of the founders of the Spoken Word/Slam poetry movement, he is a critically-acclaimed novelist, memoirist, and poet. He is the author of the memoirs Jew Boy (which has recently been optioned for a feature film) and Drunken Angel, the novel Matches, and a volume of poetry entitled, Who Are We?. In his writings, he speaks from the visceral perspective of the modern Jewish experience. The San Francisco based author is also the editor of The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry. His anthology, TheOutlaw Bible of American Literature, was reviewed on the cover of the New York Times Book Review. He’s taught at the Academy of Art University and is currently the Dean of the Free University of San Francisco.

Natalie Serber

Natalie Serber

Natalie Serber is the author of the story collection Shout Her Lovely Name (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012), a New York Times 100 “Notable Books” of 2012 and a summer reading pick from O, the Oprah Magazine, and an Oregonian Top 10 Books of the Pacific Northwest. Her fiction has appeared in The Bellingham Review, Fourth Genre, Gulf Coast, Inkwell, Hunger Mountain. Essays and reviews have appeared at, The Rumpus, The New York Times, The Oregonian, and Hunger Mountain. Awards and grants include the Barbara Deming Grant for Women Artists, Tobias Wolff Award, H.E. Francis Award, John Steinbeck Award, all for fiction, and finalist mentions for the Annie Dillard Creative Nonfiction Award, and The Third Coast Fiction Award. She received an MFA from Warren Wilson College and teaches writing at Marylhurst University in Portland, Oregon. She’s currently working on a novel set in Boring, Oregon.

Ryan Sloan

Ryan Sloan

Ryan Sloan is the author of the forthcoming novel The Plagiarists. His work has appeared in LA Weekly, Nerve, Opium Magazine, and Painted Bride Quarterly. He teaches writing at UC Berkeley, where he also serves as the Program Coordinator for the UC Berkeley Summer Creative Writing Program.

Jane Bandenburgh

Jane Vandenburgh

Jane Vandenburgh‘s latest book is The Wrong Dog Dream. She is the award-winning author of two novels, Failure to Zigzag and The Physics of Sunset, as well as the nonfiction works, Architecture of the NovelA Writer’s Handbook, and The Pocket History of Sex in the Twentieth Century, A Memoir. She has taught writing and literature at U. C. Davis, the George Washington University, and, most recently, at Saint Mary’s College in Moraga, Callfornia. A native of Berkeley, she has returned to live with her family in the West, and with Wayne Thiebaud, her new dog.

Why There Are Words celebrated its third year in January 2013, takes place every second Thursday of the month, and is the brainchild of curator Peg Alford Pursell.

Why There Are Words Reading July 11: Question

Posted in Uncategorized by whytherearewords on June 19, 2013

Question. We all do it. We all should. Come find out what questions our readers explore in their works — and maybe get some answers, too. July 11. Doors open at 7 pm; readings begin at 7:15. $10. You’ll want extra cash for books and booze. We’re at Studio 333 in Sausalito, as always.

Kate Asche

Kate Asche

Kate Asche, M.A., writes poetry, essays, and–recently–even a little fiction. A graduate of the UC Davis Creative Writing Program, she was a finalist for the 2011 Audio Contest at The Missouri Review and has poetry published in RHINO, Confrontation, Late Peaches: Poems by Sacramento Poets (2012 Anthology) and elsewhere, with poems forthcoming in Bellingham Review and Quiddity. Her creative nonfiction appears in Under the Gum Tree. A trained facilitator in the Amherst Writers and Artists Method, she was associate director of Arts, Humanities and Writing at UC Davis Extension, where she coordinated The Tomales Bay Workshops under the direction of Pam Houston. She teaches creative writing workshops in Sacramento and serves as associate editor of Tule Review (a publication of Sacramento Poetry Center). You can get the scoop on area writing events at her website. (Click on her name above.)

Christian Kiefer

Christian Kiefer

Christian Kiefer earned his PhD in American literature from the University of California, Davis, and is on the English faculty of American River College in Sacramento. He is an active poet, songwriter, and recording artist, and lives in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in Northern California with his wife and six sons. The Infinite Tides is his first published novel.

JC Miller

JC Miller

JC (Jeanne) Miller’s recent novel is Vacation (Last Light Studio Press April, 2013). She attended Tin House Writer’s Workshop, and she has been a Master Class resident at Hedgebrook Institute. Jeanne is avid reader, aspiring traveler, and table tennis enthusiast.

Tim J. Myers

Tim J. Myers

Tim J. Myers is a writer, songwriter, storyteller, and senior lecturer at Santa Clara University in Silicon Valley. His children’s books have won recognition from the New York Times, NPR, the Smithsonian, Nickelodeon, and others. He’s published over 120 poems, won a first prize in a poetry contest judged by John Updike, has two books of adult poetry out, won a major prize in science fiction, has been nominated for two Pushcart Prizes, and has published much other fiction and non-fiction for children, adolescents, and adults. His Glad to Be Dad: A Call to Fatherhood won the inaugural Ben Franklin Digital Award from the Independent Book Publishers Association and made #5 on Amazon’s “Hot New Releases in Fatherhood.” He won the West Coast Songwriters Saratoga Chapter Song of the Year award, and he won the 2012 Society of Children’s Writers and Illustrators Magazine Merit Award for Fiction. And he can whistle and hum at the same time.

Nina Schuyler

Nina Schuyler

Nina Schuyler’s latest novel is The Translator, just published (Pegasus Books 2013). Hee first novel, The Painting, was a finalist for the Northern California Book Award, and named a “Best Book of the Year” by the San Francisco Chronicle, and dubbed a “fearless debut” by MSNBC – and translated into Chinese, Portuguese, and Serbian.  She was nominated for a 2010 Pushcart Prize and teaches creative writing at the University of San Francisco. Her poems, short stories, and essays have appeared in ZYZZYVA, Santa Clara Review, Fugue, The Meadowland Review, The Battered Suitcase, and other literary journals. She reviews fiction for The Rumpus and The Children’s Book Review, and is the fiction editor at Able Muse. She earned a law degree at Hastings College of the Law and an MFA in fiction with an emphasis on poetry at San Francisco State University. She currently teaches creative writing at the University of San Francisco.

Sue Staats

Sue Staats

Sue Staats is a Sacramento writer whose fiction and poetry have appeared in Farallon Review, r.kv.r.y, Alimentum, a Journal of Food, and others. Her poem “Late Peaches” was selected as the title poem of the 2012 Sacramento Poetry Anthology. She’s a graduate of Pacific University’s low-residency MFA program, and her stories have been twice featured at Sacramento’s reading series, “Stories on Stage.” A recent finalist for the Gulf Coast Prize in Fiction and the Nisqually Prize in Fiction, she’s currently working on a collection of linked short stories, and like most of us has a novel or two lurking in the wings.

Kathleen Winter

Kathleen Winter

Kathleen Winter’s book Nostalgia for the Criminal Past (Elixir Press, 2012) won the Antivenom Prize and the 2013 Texas Institute of Letters Bob Bush Award for best first book of poems.  Her poems have appeared in Tin House, The New Republic, AGNI, Field, VOLT, Parthenon West Review, and Barrow Street.  Her work is forthcoming in New American Writing, Alaska Quarterly Review, Spillway, Stand (U.K.), and The Cincinnati Review. She lives in Sonoma County and teaches at University of San Francisco and Napa Valley College.

Why There Are Words celebrated its third year in January 2013, takes place every second Thursday of the month, and is the brainchild of curator Peg Alford Pursell.

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